Censoring movies is necessary

Your voice

  • Published 4.12.18, 1:53 PM
  • Updated 4.12.18, 1:53 PM
  • 2 mins read
  •  
Movies have a great impact on people. There are filmmakers who ignore their responsibility towards society and add commercial elements or impose their opinions through movies. These have a negative impact on communities and religions. Ankita Mondal, Jadavpur University, Calcutta Shutterstock

  • Yes

Influences the young

Nowadays, most films have unrealistic scenes. Violent scenes that motivate young viewers to copy the tasks their heroes perform on screen may cost them their lives. Films which claim that consumption of drugs is injurious to health are actually promoting the use of drugs as young minds grow curious to try them in real life. It is better such scenes are censored.

Aravind R. Nair,

Mansur Habibullah Memorial School, Calcutta

Negative impact

Movies have a great impact on people. There are filmmakers who ignore their responsibility towards society and add commercial elements or impose their opinions through movies. These have a negative impact on communities and religions.

Ankita Mondal,

Jadavpur University, Calcutta

Tackles the unacceptable

If a part of a movie contains scenes or language that cannot be accepted by people of all religions, then there will be calls to ban the movie and a riot may break out. So, to avoid them, the government has set up a board that will censor those unacceptable parts.

Akash Biswas,

St. Xavier’s School, Alipurduar

Keeps children safe

Censoring certain parts of movies helps keep children away from hearing and seeing inappropriate things. Nowadays, children are addicted to watching TV. When a film is shown on TV — and most movies are these days — children are exposed to it. Inappropriate scenes or a string of cuss words can teach them all the wrong things and have a bad influence.

Payal Roy,

Shri Shikshayatan College, Calcutta

Maintains harmony

Scenes that make a travesty of history or create friction amongst people should be completely removed. The case of the movie, Padmaavat, which released in January 2018, is the perfect example for the need of censoring movies to maintain communal harmony.

Abhinav Banerjee,

Sharda Global School, Ranchi

  • No

Obstructs creativity

Censoring parts of a film obstructs its creative flow and nullifies the effect of the narrative. It is always up to us if we want to watch a film or not. Censoring parts of it means breaking the million thoughts and ideas that go into building that film.

Rai Bhattacharyya,

Gospel Home School, Rishra

Not fair

Cinema, like other art forms, is a medium for expression. Filmmakers tran-slate their vision onto the big screen through months or years of hard work. Thus, to yield the metaphorical scissors to snip off portions deemed undesirable in a film is unfair.

Subhro Ray Chowdhury,

Dreamland School, Hooghly

Essence lost

Be it a plot or sub-plot, every part of a movie is crucial. So, with a part missing, the entire essence of the movie is lost. It’s time to leave movies in the hands of the movie’s crew, and not the certification board.

Arghya Roy,

St. James’ School, Calcutta

Certification enough

People are mature enough to make logical analysis of what is wrong and right. Films are marked with Adult or Generic certificate before their release. That should be enough. Censorship has no right to curb what the filmmaker wants to tell the audience.

Rajarshi Mukherjee,

Scottish Church College, Calcutta

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