Women's World Cup begins - India beat south korea in inaugural kabaddi match

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By ROSHAN KUMAR
  • Published 2.03.12
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Patna, March 1: The maiden Women’s World Cup Kabaddi got off to a colourful start today. With over 20,000 spectators cheering the host team, India defeated South Korea 34-18 in the inaugural match at the newly built Patliputra Sports Complex.

Sixteen teams are participating in the four-day event. Fifteen matches would be played on Friday.

Inaugurating the tournament on his birthday, chief minister Nitish Kumar said it was a proud moment for Bihar to host such a mega event in its centenary year.

Nitish said: “In the past one-and-a-half months Bihar has hosted two mega events as part of its centenary year celebrations. First, the 60th National Police Games and second the Women’s World Cup Kabaddi tournament.”

Besides the chief minister, his cabinet colleagues P.K Shahi, Sukhda Pandey, Shyam Rajak and Damodar Raut were present at the inaugural function of the World Cup.

The crowd was euphoric to witness the event. The atmosphere at the stadium was electric from 1pm, two hours before the official start of the event. All seats were occupied.

First, the flag of International Kabaddi Federation was hoisted. Soon after, 10 Indian Air Force (IAF) paratroopers, including four women, landed on the pitch. The crowd was on cloud nine watching them coming down from the sky.

After the thrilling performance of the IAF personnel, the march-past of the participating teams started. The Bangladesh team led the show rightly, as kabaddi is that country’s national game.

The Canadian team followed Bangladesh. The host team was at the tail. Led by captain Mamta Poojari, the Indian Kabaddi team took the field amid deafening applause.

Cultural programmes were also organised at the inaugural function. Three hundred students of Government Girls’ High School, Shastri Nagar, danced to the tune of “Wah Khiladi Wah”.

Composed by Braj Kishore Pandey and choreographed by Mumbai-based choreographer Sada Jadav, it reflected the Bihar’s respect for the adage Atithi Deva Bhava (visitors are gods).

The players and team managers of various countries were excited on reaching Bihar, the land of Buddha.

Mohammad Reza, the manager of the Iran team, said: “Kabaddi in Iran is getting poplar with students of universities playing the game. The Iran government is organising tournaments to promote kabaddi in the country.”

Asked what the Iran government feels about women playing kabaddi in an Islamic country, Reza said: “You can see our women team has come to play in the tournament.”