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South Africa cricket in turmoil, ICC seeks clarity

CSA has been embroiled in a governance crisis since December, when former CEO Thabang Moroe was suspended following the findings of a forensic audit that revealed ‘acts of serious misconduct’
There was no word from the ICC on the developments at CSA but sources told The Telegraph that the world body was still exploring the situation and gathering facts.

Indranil Majumdar   |   Calcutta   |   Published 12.09.20, 04:00 AM

The International Cricket Council (ICC) won’t act in haste and is likely to seek a clarification from Cricket South Africa after its board and executives, including acting CEO Kugandrie Govender, were asked to step aside on Thursday night by the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC), the controlling body for all high-performance sport in that country.

There was no word from the ICC on the developments at CSA but sources told The Telegraph that the world body was still exploring the situation and gathering facts. It was also learnt that the ICC couldn’t act unless there’s a complaint from a member board.

Any government interference in the affairs of a member board is strictly prohibited by the ICC constitution. The ICC had suspended Zimbabwe Cricket in July 2019 for almost three months following government intervention and subsequent violation of its constitution.

SASCOC will appoint a task team to investigate CSA’s administrative and financial affairs.

CSA, in a statement, has said it “does not agree with the resolution taken by SASCOC” and “is taking legal advice regarding the basis on which SASCOC has sought to intervene in the business affairs of CSA”.

It was business as usual at the CSA office on Friday but that may change once the task team takes charge.

CSA has been embroiled in a governance crisis since December, when former CEO Thabang Moroe was suspended following the findings of a forensic audit that revealed “acts of serious misconduct”. Then acting CEO Jacques Faul and president Chris Nenzani also resigned last month. The audit has not been made fully available to SASCOC since.

Former CSA and ICC chief executive Haroon Lorgat didn’t see this as government interference. “I don’t see this as government interference. CSA is a member of SASCOC and they have the authority to deal with a member in trouble,” Lorgat told The Telegraph.

“SASCOC will investigate and assess the situation and if there’s any failure on CSA’s part, it will come to light. Clearly there has been a leadership failure.”

Lorgat doesn’t think it will affect the functioning of the cricket body. “I don’t think that will be hampered in any way. They will be putting someone in charge who will look into the affairs,” the former CEO said.

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