Advertisement

Home / Entertainment / Shouldn't have said anything about retiring: Robert Redford

Shouldn't have said anything about retiring: Robert Redford

In The Old Man & the Gun, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities
Robert Redford

Kathryn Shattuck/NYTNS   |     |   Published 03.10.18, 05:08 PM

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

Advertisement

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

Earlier on Tuesday, Trump told electrical contractors gathered in Philadelphia that his economic policies would translate into more jobs for their ranks as he highlighted a new trade deal among the US, Mexico and Canada.

“We’re in the midst of a manufacturing renaissance — something which nobody thought you’d hear,” Trump said in a speech to the National Electrical Contractors Association Convention a day after celebrating the new North American trade deal.

In fact, North America already is a manufacturing powerhouse. The United States ranks No. 2 in the world behind China in manufacturing output. Mexico ranks 11th and Canada 13th, according to United Nations numbers pulled together by the Brookings Institution.

Trump calls the new trade agreement USMCA, for U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement. “Like YMCA or US Marine Corps with an A at the end,” he explained.

He said he doesn’t want to use the previous name, NAFTA, the North American Free Trade Agreement, which he contends cost American jobs and railed against during his 2016 presidential campaign. The new trade deal still must be approved by Congress.

“We are finally rebuilding our country, and we are doing it with American aluminum, American steel and with our great electrical contractors,” he said.

Trump said the strong economy “means more jobs for our great electrical contractors.”

Before departing the White House, Trump tweeted, “THE ONLY REASON TO VOTE FOR A DEMOCRAT IS IF YOU'RE TIRED OF WINNING!”

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.

This started as an article about the end of a career. But somewhere between announcing his retirement from acting in early August and the New York premiere in late September of what was to be his last film, The Old Man & the Gun, Robert Redford seemingly had a change of heart.

“I think that was a big mistake,” he said the day after the premiere. “I can’t remember how it came up, but I said something about retirement. And what I really should have done is just not said anything about it and slipped quietly away out of the mainstream into a new category.”

In The Old Man & the Gun, directed by David Lowery, Redford plays a slippery fellow with whom he shares a few similarities: Forrest Tucker, a career bank robber and escape artiste — gentlemanly, charming and on one hell of a ride — that San Quentin and Alcatraz can’t contain. Sissy Spacek is Jewel, the widow who captures Tucker’s fancy while not quite buying his tall tale, and Casey Affleck is John Hunt, the Texas detective determined to bring Tucker and his grizzled cohorts (Danny Glover and Tom Waits) to justice.

Like Tucker, Redford still has it at 82: the sonorous voice of a Western poet, the windswept hair and the knee-weakening smile, along with the spoils of an elder statesman — a best director Oscar for Ordinary People and an honorary one for a career that includes the creation of the Sundance Institute.

In an interview at the TimesCenter, where he, Spacek and Lowery had gathered for a TimesTalk, Redford spoke about the call of the wild, the power of “once upon a time” and why he’ll never again say never. These are edited excerpts from the conversation.



Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
 
 
 
Copyright © 2020 The Telegraph. All rights reserved.