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I hate meeting stars: Vishal Bhardwaj

Vishal Bhardwaj on movies, learning to play the piano and his love for Shakespeare
Vishal Bhardwaj

Karishma Upadhyay   |     |   Published 29.09.18, 06:39 PM

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By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.

By the time Vishal Bhardwaj made his directorial debut with Makdee (2002), he was already an established music composer. He had delivered brilliant soundtracks for films like Gulzar’s award-winning Maachis, Ram Gopal Varma’s cult-classic Satya and Vinay Shukla’s Godmother, which won him his first National Award. With Makdee, which screened in a special section at the Cannes Film Festival, Vishal became the only other composer after Salil Chowdhury to venture into film direction.

In the 16 years since, Vishal has dabbled across genres. He’s adapted three Shakespearean tragedies — Maqbool was an adaptation of Macbeth, Omkara of Othello and Haider of Hamlet. At the other end of the spectrum was Ruskin Bond’s children’s story The Blue Umbrella, which he made into a film too. Vishal has given us unforgettable characters like Maqbool’s Abbaji and 7 Khoon Maaf’s Susanna. There’s no doubt that Vishal is one of Bollywood’s most original filmmakers.

This week saw the release of his tenth film — Pataakha. This tale of two warring sisters is based on a short story by Charan Singh Pathik, titled Do Behnein, and features Sanya Malhotra and Radhika Madan. On the sidelines of the promotions of Pataakha, t2oS sat down for a leisurely chat with the 53-year-old director, writer, lyricist, composer, editor and producer (phew!) over butter naan and palak matar to get a sense of his creative process, actors who surprised him and learning to play the piano.



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