Monday, 30th October 2017

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Christie's auctions Mughal objects for $109 million

An auction in New York last evening established the highest total for any auction of Indian art and Mughal objects

By The Telegraph
  • Published 20.06.19, 4:05 PM
  • Updated 20.06.19, 4:05 PM
  • a few seconds read
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Christie's
Photo Credit: Christie's
The Shah Jahan Dagger with a carved jade hilt and a watered-steel blade was created between 1620-1630. It sold for $3,375,000, establishing the record price for an Indian jade object and record for a piece with Shah Jahan provenance
Christie's
Photo Credit: Christie's
The ‘devant-de-corsage’ brooch was made to order by Cartier in 1912 for Solomon Barnato Joel, who made his fortune in the South African diamond mines. As a director of Barnato Brothers as well as of De Beers Consolidated Diamonds Mines, Joel was a major influence on the diamond and gold industries at the beginning of the 20th century. His fascination with diamonds remained constant throughout his long career, and for this brooch Joel provided Cartier with his four finest stones. The brooch sold for $10,603,500 to a private collector in the room, creating a new world record.
Christie's
Photo Credit: Christie's
The Arcot Diamond from the Golconda mine, a brilliant-cut, pear-shaped, D-colour stone weighing 17.21 carats, was one of two such diamond ear drops sent as gifts to Queen Charlotte (1744-1818), the wife of King George III, from the Nawab of Arcot. The diamonds were later acquired at auction by the Marquess of Westminster and subsequently mounted in the Westminster Tiara, which was worn at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II. The diamond sold for $3,375,000.
Christie's
Photo Credit: Christie's
A turban ornament set with old, baguette and pear-shaped diamonds, white gold, fitted with plume holder on the reverse, lower portion detachable and may be worn as a brooch. Created in 1907 and remodeled in 1935. Sold for $1,815,000
Christie's
Photo Credit: Christie's
The Taj Mahal Emerald, an extraordinary large carved stone named for the carved floral engravings that were reminiscent of the coloured stone inlay of the Taj Mahal. The emerald had once formed the centrepiece of one of Cartier’s most iconic creations, the Collier Bérénice, a necklace or shoulder ornament, which was exhibited in 1925 at the Exposition des Arts Décoratifs et Industriels Modernes in Paris. Sold for $1,815,000.