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NZ’s Barclay tipped for ICC top post

The ICC on Monday had set October 18 as the deadline for filing nominations though there is no clarity over the election process
Greg Barclay

Indranil Majumdar   |   Calcutta   |   Published 14.10.20, 03:18 AM

Greg Barclay, a director of New Zealand Cricket since 2012 and who is currently its nominee on the ICC board, could emerge as the compromise candidate for the post of chairman of the International Cricket Council (ICC).

The Telegraph understands that Barclay’s candidature could be acceptable to the Big Three — BCCI, Cricket Australia and England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) — and the opposing body that includes Pakistan Cricket Board (PCB), ICC’s interim chairman Imran Khwaja, Sri Lanka Cricket and Zimbabwe Cricket, among others.

Khwaja represents Singapore, one of the three associate members on the ICC board, while Scotland and Malaysia have not committed their support to any bloc.

Independent director Indra Nooyi is believed to be aligned with the opposing group.

The ICC board comprises the chairman, chief executive, 12 full-member directors, three associates and the independent director. The chief executive, however, doesn’t have a vote.

The ICC on Monday had set October 18 as the deadline for filing nominations though there is no clarity over the election process. The ICC has remained divided over the process — whether a simple or two-thirds majority will elect the chairman.

Former ECB chairman Colin Graves enjoys the backing of the Big Three, which comprises the majority bloc and had been insisting on a simple majority. The PCB-led group, which is learnt to have been pitching for the continuance of Khwaja, wants a two-thirds majority.

There’s very little chance of the impasse ending until a compromise candidate is agreed upon. Barclay’s candidature will also satisfy PCB chairman Ehsan Mani’s demand of having someone in the hot seat from outside the Big Three.

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