Fans, fellow cricketers celebrate a legend as Yuvraj Singh hangs up his boots

Yuvraj last played an ODI representing India versus the West Indies in 2017

  • Published 10.06.19, 7:13 PM
  • Updated 10.06.19, 7:13 PM
  • a min read
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Yuvraj Singh addresses media after announcing his retirement from international cricket in Mumbai Picture by AP

Cricketer Yuvraj Singh, the star of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2011 and World Twenty20 in 2007, has announced his retirement from international cricket with immediate effect.

Yuvraj last played an ODI representing India versus the West Indies in 2017. He will be remembered for his 17 centuries and 11,000 runs in all formats of the game.

The cricketing community lauded Yuvraj for a successful international career after he made the announcement. Many took to Twitter to celebrate his career, which often involved match-winning innings, and wish him the best for the future.

He has also been feted for his contribution as an all-rounder: a handy batsman, clever left-arm bowler and a lightning-fast fielder.

“I have decided to move on,” Yuvraj said during a news conference in Mumbai.

He did not have the best of farewells, though. His team, Mumbai Indians, may have won this year’s IPL but he was benched for many of the matches.

His teammates from the Indian cricket team, including captain Virat Kohli, took to Twitter to congratulate Yuvraj on an illustrious career:

One of the high points of Yuvraj’s career came during the World Twenty20 tournament in Durban when he hit a hapless Stuart Broad for six consecutive sixes. 

Yuvraj hit his career high during the World Cup of 2011 at home. He scored 362 runs, claimed 15 wickets and four man of the match awards in a campaign that earned India the second World Cup title. He was adjudged the Man of the Series. What made this success even more remarkable was when it emerged later that through the tournament, he had been battling cancer.

So long, champ and all the best for your next innings. 

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