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Home / North-east / Mizoram records first Covid death

Mizoram records first Covid death

As on Wednesday evening, 2,607 positive cases have been detected in the state, of which 368 are active cases
The first case in the state was recorded on March 24

Umanand Jaiswal   |   Guwahati   |   Published 29.10.20, 01:29 AM

Mizoram recorded its first Covid-19 death on Wednesday afternoon, 219 days after the state recorded its first positive case. So far it had been the only state in the country without any fatality from the virus.

DIPR Mizoram was the first to tweet about the demise of a 66-year-old man with “existing comorbidities” around noon at Zoram Medical College, a dedicated Covid hospital, where he was “undergoing treatment for more than 10 days”.

Mizoram chief minister Zoranthanga also tweeted the development. “#Mizoram records our first Covid-19 related mortality... We are shocked, pained and will continue putting up our guards against this pandemic #TogetherWeCan #MizoramAgainstCovid19 @HMOIndia,” he said.

The patient, who tested positive for Covid-19 on October 19, was from the Dawrpui locality of state capital Aizawl, which is under strict lockdown since Tuesday morning till November 3 to check the surge in cases. As on Wednesday evening, 2,607 positive cases have been detected, of which 368 are active cases.

Dr Pachuau Lalmalsawma, state nodal officer of the integrated disease surveillance programme and health department spokesperson on Covid-19, told The Telegraph that the patient suffered a heart attack.

“Sooner or later it (death) was expected because the patient was in a very bad shape. He had comorbidities like hypertension, diabetes and liver disease. He suffered a heart attack today,” he said.

The doctor said the people of the state have to strictly follow appropriate Covid-19 behaviour because there has not only been a surge in positive cases but also most of them are symptomatic. The first case in the state was recorded on March 24.

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