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Home / India / Karnataka: Supreme Court agrees to list pleas against hijab ban

Karnataka: Supreme Court agrees to list pleas against hijab ban

Meenakshi Arora was appearing for petitioners who had wanted early hearing of the appeal since many Muslim girls discontinued their education
Last month the Karnataka High court had ruled that wearing of headscarf is not an essential religious practice in Islam and is a reasonable restriction on the freedom of speech and expression.
Last month the Karnataka High court had ruled that wearing of headscarf is not an essential religious practice in Islam and is a reasonable restriction on the freedom of speech and expression.
File photo

Our Legal Correspondent   |   New Delhi   |   Published 27.04.22, 12:52 AM

Chief Justice of India N.V. Ramana on Tuesday assured that the batch of appeals challenging the Karnataka High Court judgment upholding the ban imposed by the state on the hijab will be heard in the Supreme Court in two days.

“You just wait, we will take it up in two days,” the bench, also comprising Justices Krishna Murari and Hima Kohli, told senior advocate Meenakshi Arora during the morning mentioning time.

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Arora was appearing for some of the petitioners who had wanted early hearing of the appeal since many Muslim girls discontinued their education in view of the ban.

Last month the Karnataka High court had ruled that wearing of headscarf is not an essential religious practice in Islam and is a reasonable restriction on the freedom of speech and expression.

“Prescription of school dress code to the exclusion of hijab, bhagwa, or any other apparel symbolic of religion can be a a step forward in the direction of emancipation and more particularly, to the access to education. It hardly needs to be stated that this does not rob of the autonomy of women or their right to education in as much as they can wear any apparel of their choice outside the classroom,” the high court had said while upholding the state government’s order dated February 5, imposing ban on headscarf or other apparel symbolic of one’s religion.



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