Advertisement

Home / India / Navjot Singh Sidhu in hospital for liver treatment

Navjot Singh Sidhu in hospital for liver treatment

He underwent a medical examination at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research’s hepatology department on Monday morning
Navjot Singh Sidhu.
Navjot Singh Sidhu.
File photo

PTI   |   Chandigarh   |   Published 07.06.22, 03:38 AM

Jailed Congress leader Navjot Singh Sidhu was admitted to Chandigarh’s PGIMER on Monday afternoon for liver-related problems and is stable.

He underwent a medical examination at the Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research’s hepatology department in the morning.

In the afternoon, Sidhu was admitted to the PGIMER, where he had been brought under heavy security from the Patiala prison.

In the evening, PGIMER issued a statement saying Sidhu has been kept under observation and is stable.

“Former Indian cricketer Shri Navjot Singh Sidhu has been admitted in hepatology ward, Nehru Hospital Extension, PGIMER, Chandigarh, due to liver-related problems and requires further evaluation.

“He has been kept under observation and is stable now,” the statement said, quoting Professor Virender Singh, head of the hepatology department at the hospital.

The former Punjab Congress chief was on May 20 sent to the Patiala central jail in a 1988 road rage death case. He has been sentenced to one-year rigorous imprisonment by the Supreme Court.

About two weeks ago, Sidhu was taken to Rajindra Hospital in Patiala for a medical examination.

The cricketer-turned-politician’s counsel, H.P.S. Verma, recently said Sidhu had sought a special diet in prison.

According to the counsel, Sidhu cannot consume wheat, sugar, “maida” and some other food items.

“He can have berries, papaya, guava, double-toned milk and food items which do not have fibre and carbohydrates,” Verma had said.

Sidhu, 58, had in 2015 undergone treatment for acute deep vein thrombosis (DVT) at a hospital in Delhi. DVT is caused by a blood clot in a deep vein.



Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
 
 
 
Copyright © 2020 The Telegraph. All rights reserved.