An 'artificial soldier' comes to life - 26-year-old Giridih techie builds spy robot prototype for Rs 22000, wins laurels at IIT fests

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By VISHVENDU JAIPURIAR
  • Published 23.08.11
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Biowar. Lethal agents. Fatality. If the future morphs into one hazardous, sweat-soaked existence, machines, not man, will be the saviour, envisions engineering graduate Rishav Kumar.

The 26-year-old Giridih boy has designed the prototype of a spy robot, which he claims can be used in hi-tech military warfare and even space research given its remarkable surveillance potential.

The 30-centimetre-long gadget, raved about by a host of tech cradles including the elite Delhi and Kharagpur IITs, can be remote-controlled up to 500 metres, transmit real-time audio and video through advanced cameras and microphones, explore difficult terrain with wide-area belt track on wheels and has a mechanised arm to lift anything up to 0.5kg.

An air gun is also mounted on the robot and synchronised with the camera to increase firing accuracy, while a solar panel provides driving energy during daytime and also recharges the battery. High-intensity lights ensure night vision. The cost of designing what Rishav calls his artificial soldier is an affordable Rs 22,000.

Speaking to The Telegraph at his residence in Makatpur Mohalla of Giridih, Rishav, who graduated in telecommunications from Sri Siddhartha Institute of Technology in Bangalore this year, said he was always drawn towards machines. “I designed the robot as part of my final-year project. It was a dream come true.”

“My artificial soldier can replace humans in war zones where surveillance is involved or collection of hazardous samples is imperative. It can help save lives,” he added.

Son of businessman father Rajesh Kumar Kandhway and homemaker Madhu Kandhway, Rishav completed his matriculation from Carmel Convent School and plus two from BNS DAV Public School in Giridih before moving to the southern city. Elder brother Sourav Kumar, a software engineer in England, is his role model.

Rishav designed his robot last year — though the project was submitted this July — and has been felicitated by various institutions, including National Design and Research Forum (NDRF), Bangalore, since then.

While he won the first prize in project exhibition at Tryst-2010, the annual technical festival at IIT-Delhi, the NDRF honoured him with a bronze in the electronics and telecommunication design category in January this year. “I also received a certificate of appreciation in the open hardware section during Khsitij-2011, the annual tech carnival of IIT-Kharagpur. My work has been recognised at the international-level festival at Vellore Institute of Technology,” he said.

Rishav’s robot also earned raves at MS Ramaiah Institute of Technology in Bangalore and bagged the top honour in the hobby project section at the national-level technical symposium at Siddaganga Institute of Technology, Tumkur.

With such great acclaim in his kitty, it is no surprise that the promising youth has found prestigious placement with Tata Consultancy Services, Hyderabad, with an annual package of Rs 3.16 lakh.

Now, what next? “I will build advanced robots to strengthen the defence apparatus of my country,” he signed off.