Advertisement

Home / Opinion / Take flight

Take flight

Readers' Speak: Rise in sparrow numbers; fascism and Hindu Rashtra; Bushfire Cricket Bash
A recent report on bird population has revealed that the count of the house sparrow, the Indian peafowl and certain other avian species in India has increased.
A recent report on bird population has revealed that the count of the house sparrow, the Indian peafowl and certain other avian species in India has increased.
Shutterstock

The Telegraph   |   Published 18.02.20, 06:45 PM

Sir — A recent report on bird population has revealed that the count of the house sparrow, the Indian peafowl and certain other avian species in India has increased (“50 bird species dwindle, sparrow count stable”, Feb 18). While this may appear as a relief, one must remember that several other kinds of birds, such as the red-necked falcon, the Indian cuckoo and the blue rock thrush, have decreased in number. The environment ministry must take urgent steps to save these species.

Jayanti Saha,

Advertisement

Calcutta

Stand together

Sir — In the article, “On the brink” (Feb 12), Prabhat Patnaik has beautifully analysed the subtle difference between the terms, ‘Hindu rashtra’ and ‘fascist State’, and how one is related to the other. He explains that many belonging to the majority community in India may be under the impression that the atrocities being perpetrated by the ruling dispensation in India will not affect them but, in reality, they are living in a fool’s paradise, denying the danger that awaits. The operative mantra of fascists is to rule by coercion. Once they are done oppressing the minority communities with their coercive measures, only the majority community will survive to bear the brunt of fascism.

Fascists are necessarily bullies. When the Narendra Modi-led government implemented demonetization across the country in the name of eliminating black money, it affected the common people more than black-marketers. This step was a unique experimentation in bullying. Having succeeded with this without much resistance, the present rulers went ahead with graver measures — the implementation of the National Register of Citizens in Assam, the passage of the Citizenship (Amendment) Act in Parliament, the shutdown in Kashmir and so on. Had these leaders not been blinded by their arrogance, they would have noticed that the people of India are on the verge of losing their patience. The protests rising from different quarters — Jawaharlal Nehru University, Jamia Millia Islamia, Shaheen Bagh — are all writings on the wall for the ruling dispensation.

Sanjit Ghatak,

South 24 Parganas

Sir — The article, “On the brink”, is praiseworthy in the way it captures the present situation of India, a country pushed to the edge of a disastrous future by the ruling dispensation. The resistance posed by the common people is indeed the last line of defence against oppressive regimes. The only hope for the country lies in the “courage and commitment” of the people who raise their voices in defence of democracy. Of this, the women of Shaheen Bagh, Park Circus and Ghanta Ghar, who have been resisting the Centre’s misrule relentlessly, are a prime example.

With the Aam Aadmi Party winning the elections in Delhi by a massive mandate, the light of hope shines somewhat brighter. It shows that with the will of the voters, the Bharatiya Janata Party can become extinct as quickly as it rose to power.

Asit Kumar Mitra,

Calcutta

Fiery legends

Sir — The Bushfire Cricket Bash, organized this year as part of a fundraising drive for the Red Cross to support those affected by the devastating Australian bushfires, was heart-warming. It was a treat to watch cricketing legends from yesteryear engaging in their craft once more, with stalwarts like Wasim Akram, Brian Lara and Courtney Walsh taking the field.

Players from both men’s and women’s teams, and even firefighters involved in combating the bushfires, participated in the match and the post-match activities. It was heartening to see such icons representing a noble cause. At a time when cricket has become ultra-competitive and overly aggressive, this match was a throwback to a time when the spirit of the game was given precedence over rivalries.

Abhiroop Sen,

Calcutta



Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
 
 
 
Copyright © 2020 The Telegraph. All rights reserved.