Monday, 30th October 2017

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Bruised feet hit back

#KuToo, a movement that started with Japanese women refusing to wear punishing heels to work, is spreading

  • Published 28.03.19, 5:23 PM
  • Updated 28.03.19, 5:23 PM
  • a min read
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The name of the movement is a pun, combining the Japanese words for shoe (“kutsu”) and pain (“kutsuu”) and referencing #MeToo Shutterstock

A successor to the #MeToo movement has come from the women of Japan, who are protesting the tradition of wearing high heels to work.

#KuToo started in January when Yumi Ishikawa, a 32-year-old model and actress, demanded on Twitter that Japanese employers should not require women to wear high heels to work.

The name of the movement is a pun, combining the Japanese words for shoe (“kutsu”) and pain (“kutsuu”) and referencing #MeToo.

A Twitter user from Japan says: “Wearing uncomfortable and harmful shoes is not an obligation. Let’s break down the misogyny together.”

Another woman from Japan tweets: “This movement (is) saying that this is a social problem, not a women’s problem.”

The movement on Twitter is snowballing. A user brings up an incident in London, reported by BBC, when a London receptionist was sent home from work after refusing to wear high heels.

“Interesting story about Japan’s #kutoo campaign against social pressure on women to wear high heels -- which brings to mind South Korea’s ‘escape the corset' movement to cast off the country's strict beauty standards on everything from makeup to clothing,” says another Twitter user.