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Arjun Chakrabarty takes a groupfie with Abir, Sudeshna, Ishaa, Gaurav, Ridhima, Sreeja, and Sauraseni at the dinner zone

Scenes from The Telegraph She Awards 2020

From the dapper decor to a scrumptious dinner, we've got everything covered!

By The Telegraph
  • Published 22.02.20, 7:55 PM
  • Updated 22.02.20, 7:55 PM
  • 2 mins read
  •  

The scrumptious spread by JW Marriott Kolkata

An array of dishes from Peruvian, Japanese, Turkish and Indian cuisines awaited the guests after the awards ceremony. With each dish trying to steal the limelight from the other, guests couldn’t decide what to eat and what to skip.

While the Peruvian offerings included dishes like Berenjena Salteada, which is eggplant made with red onion, coriander, tomato and served with quinoa on the side, the Japanese side of the spread offered the usual array of delectable sushi, udon noodles and more. As always, the sight of meat rotating around on a heavy stick at the Turkish counter drew people into lining up for their share of shawarma, while the Indian counter lived up to its name with its flavourful biryani and Sikanderi Raan served with Yakhni Pulao.

The award and the dinner ended on the sweetest note with desserts like pralines, macaroons, ice creams and cheesecakes. Needless to say, the happy faces at the end of the show didn’t belong just to the awardees.

The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
The scrumptious spread by JW Marriott Kolkata
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
The scrumptious spread by JW Marriott Kolkata
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Rohan Arora at the bar
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
The tipple flowed freely, ensuring a light and heady evening!
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
June
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Priyanka and Madhumita bond over glasses of Jacob’s Creek wine

Here’s how JW Marriott Kolkata decked up for IIHM presents The Telegraph she awards 2020

Capturing the spirit of the awards in the look and feel of the venue was no mean task. The challenge was taken up by event company Cherry Tree and its founder-director Rishabh Bapna. As in earlier editions, he collaborated with scenographer Swarup Dutta as well as Baisakhi and Romit Ghosh of Baisakhi Flowers to conceptualise the overall decor comprising a mix of gorgeous flower arrangements and vibrant red installations. Here’s a look at the making of the event...

The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Stage: The stage was adorned with five LCD screens. The backdrop was set off by mirrored strips and two red illuminated installations. “The central LCD was a circular one because it represented the bindi a woman wears,” said Rishabh. “The two red installations were a sort of a geometric representation of a flowing waterbody. The entire piece was wrapped in red thread that is supposed to be auspicious. The wrapping took about a week to do,” said Swarup. “The red flowing waterbody installation represented the flowing emotions of a woman and there was a lot of trial and error involved when making it,” said Baisakhi.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
outdoors: The entrances were decked up with two red flower pots both four feet tall. The flowers used for it? Gypsophilas, dahlias, coxcombs and others. “Other than coxcomb, most of the flowers used were from the city. The concept had to do with Calcutta, its flowers and its women, which we thought was very appropriate,” said Baisakhi. Along with the flower pots, an installation called the Search Lights was also set up. “The Search Lights depicted the search for talent. It was developed aesthetically because the awardees were under the focus light,” said Swarup.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Bar: The bar was quite a sight and popped as a patch of brilliant red at the venue. It was set up under a semi-circular canopy that was adorned with red velvet and fiery red chiffon fabric. The bar counter also had acrylic panels. “The acrylic panel was supposed to create an illusion of a mirage. The emphasis was on the textiles used in this art piece. For example, the velvet was used to express richness and poshness,” said Swarup. “The bar had a chic look because it represented good taste and aesthetic value, which was relevant to the cause of the event. The red chiffon fabric lends it aesthetic value and is also of the colour of kundalini,” said Baisakhi.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Entrance: As the guests stepped in to JW Marriott Kolkata, they were faced with a eight-feet-tall replica of the She Award trophy. “If you look at the hair of the trophy, it kind of resembles a tree and that’s exactly how a woman is, she gives you shape and nurtures you. So we worked on this piece keeping that idea in mind,” said Swarup. “The base is stacked with red flowers. The colour red denotes and acknowledges the nari shakti (women power) of our society. The flowers have aesthetic value and the redness shows the kundalini,” said Baisakhi.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
pre-function area: The ceiling had 40 stunning flower chandeliers — black cone-like structures with brilliant red flower spirals in them — hanging from it. “Local flowers were mostly used in the making of this year’s She Awards decor. The magnitude and boldness of the structures is the manifestation of a woman’s character. Still, it also has the love and beauty of a mother. This concept really befitted the decor for She Awards,” said Baisakhi.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
chawal work: Vibrant and intricate! This 12-feet-tall installation was made with rice. “This piece took about a week to put together. We had to convert the trophy, designed by Narayan Sinha, into an illustration and then get to the rice, painting and artwork. The trophy somehow resembles a woman in a forest so we tried to bring that out in this piece,” said Swarup. “There is a lot of intricacy involved when it comes to tracing the trophy and putting it in a frame. We used at least 50kg of rice for this art piece,” said Baisakhi.
The Telegraph
Photo Credit: The Telegraph
Swarup Dutta, Baisakhi Ghosh and Romit Ghosh, Rishabh Bapna

“Women who receive this award are luminaries in their respective fields who inspire many others! It’s our objective to make the space evocative and inspiring. As someone who comes from a background of crafts and design, it’s my endeavour to use local artisanal techniques in my projects. I have strived for the last three years to achieve this goal. We have extensively used the jute rope artisans for this year’s project. We wanted to tell a story and make inspired artwork because the women who won are inspirational,” said Swarup Dutta, scenographer.

“She Awards is actually acknowledging the nari shakti of our society. Today’s nari shakti is a manifestation of the boldness of a man, yet it is special because it also has the softness of a mother. The decor just speaks the same language, it had the boldness and the magnitude, but lots of softness, love and beauty, which came across predominantly through the flowers,” said Baisakhi Ghosh and Romit Ghosh, directors, Baisakhi Flowers.

The Telegraph She Awards is one event that I personally look forward to every year. For us at Cherry Tree, this is the third year we have been given the mandate to handle this event end-to-end. It gives us complete freedom to curate an experience for all the guests, which is something that we are very proud of. I am very thankful to the entire management of ABP and everyone who has supported us for reposing the faith in us. It is a big motivation for us to raise the bar every year,” said Rishabh Bapna, founder-director of event management company Cherry Tree.