After-effect of Black 

The Golden Globes turned famously black this year, with actors turning up in the colour in solidarity with the Time’s Up and #MeToo movements. The show is over, but its after-effects go on.

  • Published 8.02.18
  •  

The Golden Globes turned famously black this year, with actors turning up in the colour in solidarity with the Time’s Up and #MeToo movements. The show is over, but its after-effects go on.

The latest issue of Vogue features 11 leading designers speaking on fashion after the red carpet revolution and how the industry should change.

“The red carpet is such a beautiful and highly visible platform for women to speak about issues that deserve to be on the agenda, that deserve time.

As designers, we should give them something to talk about, whether it be our values and principles as a brand or the way we create and produce following ethical and sustainable methods,” Prabal Gurung has been quoted as saying.

“What was particularly interesting for me regarding the black dress code at the Golden Globes were the unique and personal choices that each woman made. The #MeToo and Time’s Up movements have just reinforced why I started my brand to begin with,” says Brandon Maxwell. “My first few collections were made up of mostly all black dresses—it was never about outshining the woman, it was about giving her an option that she felt great in, that she felt strong in, that she felt confident in, but the idea was never to dress her in something that allowed the conversation to be solely about the clothes.”

About
Author