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Electric two-wheelers rev up

The FAME II incentive excludes lead acid batteries from its ambit

By Anasuya Basu in Calcutta
  • Published 5.08.19, 1:16 AM
  • Updated 5.08.19, 1:16 AM
  • a min read
  •  
Okinawa, an Indian electric two-wheeler company set up in 2015, is the first company to get approval under FAME II. (Picture: Okinawa website)

Electric two-wheeler makers are charged up after the recent policy props from the government, though they feel awareness among customers is key to a faster adoption.

The government recently approved the second phase of the FAME incentive scheme (Faster Adoption and Manufacturing of (Hybrid &) Electric Vehicles in India) for three years starting April 1. Further, the GST rate on electric vehicles has been lowered to 5 per cent from 12 per cent.

Okinawa, an Indian electric two-wheeler company set up in 2015, is the first company to get approval under FAME II.

Gemopai Electric, a joint venture between Goreen E Mobility and Opai Electric, a Chinese brand, has not yet qualified for FAME II certification, but remains upbeat about the Indian market.

Under FAME II, only electric two-wheelers with 50 per cent localisation can qualify for the incentives. Further, the two-wheelers should have a minimum range of 80 km per charge and minimum top speed of 40 kmph, along with riders on energy efficiency, minimum acceleration and a higher number of charging cycles.

The FAME II incentive excludes lead acid batteries from its ambit.

The other two companies to get FAME II certification are Ather Energy and Yulu.

Founded by Jeetender Sharma and Rupali Sharma, Okinawa Autotech Pvt Ltd manufactures electric scooters at its facility at Biwadi in Rajasthan, which has an annual capacity of 90,000 units in one shift. The facility came up in 2016 and the company has invested Rs 100 crore till date, Sharma told The Telegraph over telephone.

With 80 per cent localisation, Okinawa’s I-Praise and Ridge Plus models easily qualified for the FAME II certification. These models have detachable lithium-ion batteries, which provides consumers the ease of charging anytime anywhere at their own convenience.

Gemopai Electric, an EV start-up, too, is hoping for a better customer response. It has sold about 2,500 units till date.

“We have a complete technology transfer and are developing EVs under the licence in India,” said Amit Raj Singh, co-founder and managing director of Gemopai Electric.

Its products include Ryder, launched in September 2018, having a range of 70-90 km per charge. The Astrid has a range of 80-90 km per charge.