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Home / World / Russia launches world's first Covid vaccine

Russia launches world's first Covid vaccine

Medical workers, teachers and other risk groups to be the first to be inoculated
Russian President Vladimir Putin attends a cabinet meeting at the Novo-Ogaryovo residence outside Moscow on Tuesday

Our Bureau, Agencies   |   Moscow   |   Published 11.08.20, 04:19 PM

Russia President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday said the country has developed the "first" coronavirus vaccine. It has been developed by Gamaleya Research Institute and the Russian Defence Ministry.

Putin made the claim during a government meeting where he described it as "a very important step for the world", the Sputniknews reported.

Putin said that the vaccine has been registered for use and one of his daughters has already been inoculated. 

"After the first vaccination, she had a body temperature of 38 degrees Celsius, while the following day it was slightly over 37 degrees Celsius, that's it. After the second injection, the second vaccination, her temperature also rose a little, and then everything cleared up, she feels good and the [antibody] titers are high, Putin said.

Putin thanked everyone who worked on the first-ever vaccine against the coronavirus and hoped that Russia will be able to start mass production of this medication in the near future.

"I hope that our colleagues abroad will also move forward, and there will be quite a lot of products that can be used on the market, on the world market for medicines and vaccines," Putin was quoted as saying by the agency.

He emphasised on the fact that the vaccine underwent the necessary tests. Russian authorities have said that medical workers, teachers and other risk groups will be the first to be inoculated.

Russia is the first country to register a coronavirus vaccine. Many scientists in the country and abroad have been skeptical, however, questioning the decision to register the vaccine before Phase 3 trials that normally last for months and involve thousands of people.

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