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Home / India / India ready to supply food stock to world if WTO permits, says Modi

India ready to supply food stock to world if WTO permits, says Modi

PM lauds Patidars, hails community for remaining at the forefront in providing help to the needy people
Narendra Modi
Narendra Modi
File picture

Our Bureau, PTI   |   Ahmedabad   |   Published 12.04.22, 03:29 PM

Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Tuesday said during his talk with US President Joe Biden, that he offered to supply India's food stock to the world if the World Trade Organisation (WTO) accords permission.

"Food stock in different parts of the world is dwindling due to the war (in Ukraine)," Modi said after inaugurating a boys' hostel and education complex of Shree Annapurna Dham Trust in Adalaj near Ahmedabad in Gujarat via video link.

He said the world is amazed to learn that India is providing free rations to nearly 80 crores of its people for over two years following the emergence of COVID-19.

"Today, the world is facing an uncertain situation as nobody is getting what they want. Petrol, oil and fertilizers are hard to procure as all the doors are getting closed. Everybody wants to secure their stocks after this (Russia-Ukraine) war began," Modi said.

"The world is facing a new problem now; the food stock of the world is getting empty, I was talking to the US President, and he also raised this issue. I suggested that if WTO gives permission, India is ready to supply food stock to the world from tomorrow," he said.

"We already have enough food for our people but our farmers seem to have made arrangements to feed the world. However, we have to work according to the laws of the world, so I don't know when WTO will give permission and we can supply food to the world," Modi said.

He said the world is amazed to learn that India is providing free ration to nearly 80 crore of its people for over two years following the emergence of COVID-19.

"Providing good grains to crore of people for such a long time does amaze the world," he said.

Goddess Annapurna is the reigning deity of Leuva Patels, a sub-sect of the politically significant Patidar community in Gujarat. On the occasion, the PM also performed a virtual ground breaking ceremony for a hospital coming up at Adalaj village near Ahmedabad.

In his address, Modi lauded the Patidars, saying the community remains at the forefront in providing help the needy people.

He said the Indian government recently got back an idol of Goddess Annapurna, which was stolen many decades back, from Canada and installed it back at a temple in Kashi.

Stressing on the need to switch to natural farming to save the earth from harmful effects of chemicals, the PM said farmers will definitely get good results within three to four years.

Sharing his views on the ongoing fight against malnutrition, Modi said it is the lack of knowledge about the right food, and not lack of food, which is largely responsible for malnutrition.

To make the masses aware about nutritional values of various food items, the prime minister urged the Annapurna Dham trust president, Narhari Amin, who is a Rajya Sabha member, to telecast a video showing benefits of healthy food on TV inside the newly constructed dining hall on the campus.

On the occasion, Modi praised Gujarat Chief Minister Bhupendra Patel, saying his government did a very good job on the COVID-19 vaccination front.

"Many businessmen, as well as members of the Patidar community, frequently go abroad. Authorities in those countries ask them whether they have taken the precaution dose or not. Now, we have also started administering a precautionary dose of COVID-19. People can now take it and go abroad," he said.

The PM also urged the young generation to get trained as per the needs of "Industry 4.0".

"This is an era of skill development. I am talking about the new set of skills compatible with Industry 4.0. Children should be prepared for such skills. I am confident that Gujarat will take a lead in this direction," he said.



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