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Do good, eat good

Tips on healthy foods and their benefits from the director of culinary innovation at leading corporate catering company Elior India

David Edward Raj   |     |   Published 01.04.21, 12:54 AM

• Set a to-do-list – there’s nothing better than the satisfaction of ticking off your achievements.

• Focus on eating natural, unprocessed foods. Tune into your hunger and satiety levels; your body’s own regulatory system is more advanced than any diet sheet or calorie chart will ever be.

• Saving starchy carbohydrates such as sweet potatoes, rice, and oats for the first thing in the morning or straight after exercise will allow you to take advantage of your body’s increased sensitivity to insulin and reduced glycogen levels at these times.

• Remember good fats are also essential. They should be eaten daily. Nuts, seeds, avocado, egg yolk and raw butter are great sources.

Foods that support the immune system

• Blueberries contain a type of flavonoid called anthocyanin, which has antioxidant properties. Research found that people who ate foods rich in flavonoids were less likely to get an upper respiratory tract infection.

• Dark chocolate contains an antioxidant called theobromine which may help boost immunity. But it is to be had in moderation.

• Turmeric has curcumin, a compound that has anti-inflammatory effects.

• Broccoli is a good source of Vitamin C and antioxidants.

• Sweet potatoes are rich in beta carotene, a source of Vitamin A. Good for healthy skin.

• Spinach contains flavonoids, carotenoids, Vitamin C and Vitamin E.

• Ginger is credited with anti-inflammatory and antioxidative properties.

• Garlic is a common home remedy for the prevention of colds and other illness.

• Sunflower seeds, a tasty addition to salads or breakfast bowls, are a rich source of Vitamin E, an antioxidant.

• Almonds are an excellent source of Vitamin E and also of manganese, magnesium and fibre. A handful of almonds is a very healthy snack.

• Oranges and kiwis are a great source of Vitamin C.

• For people trying to avoid sugar in fruit, red bell peppers are an excellent source of Vitamin C. Stir-frying and roasting both preserve their nutrient content.

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