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regular-article-logo Saturday, 02 March 2024

Very comfortable: Mike Reiss on his journey to the ocean floor inside Titan

The producer-cum-writer for The Simpsons boarded the vessel last summer. He said that passengers had to sign a waiver that mentioned death three times on the first page

New York Times News Service New York Published 22.06.23, 06:39 AM
OceanGate Expeditions, which operates the vessel, has described the trip on its website as a “thrilling and unique travel experience"

OceanGate Expeditions, which operates the vessel, has described the trip on its website as a “thrilling and unique travel experience" Twitter/@dossantosprici

Passengers seeking a glimpse of the RMS Titanic aboard the submersible that disappeared in the North Atlantic this week have endured hours in a dangerous drop to the ocean floor aboard a cramped craft with a single porthole.

Mike Reiss, a producer and writer for The Simpsons, boarded the vessel, known as the Titan, last summer. He said that passengers were required to sign a waiver that mentioned death three times on the first page.

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Passengers on his 10-hour journey — a trip that can cost up to $250,000 — were composed but excited, he said. Sandwiches and water were available on the vessel, but he recalled being told that many passengers did not eat during the journey because of excitement and that the rudimentary toilet on board had never been used.

OceanGate Expeditions, which operates the vessel, has described the trip on its website as a “thrilling and unique travel experience”. The company did not immediately respond to a request for more information on Tuesday.

The Titan is a tight fit. David Pogue, a CBS reporter and former New York Times tech columnist who has been on board, described the cylinder as “about the size of a minivan”.

Images from OceanGate show a vessel with an interior like a metal tube, where passengers can sit on the flat floor with their backs to the curved walls. There is some overhead lighting but no chairs, and little room to move or stand upright.

Still, Reiss described the journey to the Titanic as “very comfortable”.

New York Times News Service

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