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Home / Sports / Cricket / Jhulan Goswami becomes first woman to claim 250 ODI wickets

Jhulan Goswami becomes first woman to claim 250 ODI wickets

The India veteran dismissed England's Tammy Beaumonth to reach the landmark figure
Jhulan Goswami.
Jhulan Goswami.
File picture.

Our Bureau, Agencies   |   Published 16.03.22, 12:04 PM

Veteran India pacer Jhulan Goswami on Wednesday became the first bowler in history to complete 250 wickets in women's ODIs. Jhulan, playing in her 199th ODI match, achieved the feat while bowling against England in a group phase match of the ICC Women's World Cup at the Bay Oval in Mount Maunganui.

Jhulan dismissed England's Tammy Beaumonth to reach the landmark figure. The India veteran is already the highest wicket-taker in women's ODI matches. Former Australia cricketer Cathryn Fitzpatrick is second in the list of most wickets in women's ODIs, with 180 wickets to her name, reports ndtv.com

Earlier, inconsistency returned to haunt Indian batters as they produced a below-par effort to be bundled out for a meagre 134 by defending champions England.

Previous game's centurion Smriti Mandhana (35) top-scored, while wicketkeeper-batter Richa Ghosh made 33 before England bowled out India in 36.2 overs after opting to field first.

It was in sharp contrast to India's performance against the West Indies in their last match when they rode on centuries from Mandhana and Harmanpreet Kaur to post 317 for 8, their highest total in the history of the showpiece event.

Charlie Dean (4/23) was the pick of the bowlers for England while Anya Shrubsole also chipped in with two wickets as the Indians failed to build a decent partnership.

Having suffered three defeats from as many matches so far, it is a must-win match for title holders and four-time champions England.

India, on the other hand, were third in the standings before the start of the match with four points from three matches, having beaten Pakistan and the West Indies and lost to New Zealand.



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