The Telegraph
Monday , May 6 , 2013
 
IN TODAY'S PAPER
WEEKLY FEATURES
CITIES AND REGIONS
ARCHIVES
Since 1st March, 1999
 
THE TELEGRAPH
 
 
CIMA Gallary

Tejaswi takes on chacha

Tejaswi Yadav referred to the chief minister as Nitish chacha (uncle) but minced no words while criticising the government for failing to provide education or employment to youths in the state.

Addressing the youth convention of the RJD at Urdu Library Hall in the town on Sunday, Lalu Prasad’s son said: “Most of the assurances of the present government are futuristic. Every government department is plagued with corruption. The crime rate in the state has actually gone up instead of going down, as the government claims.”

He added that people should check out the police website — http://biharpolice.bih.nic.in — to find out the real state of the crime graph in Bihar.

Tejaswi also said the state of education in the state was dismal. “Students are taught English alphabets as late as Class V.”

He added that the nine engineering colleges in the state neither had infrastructure nor faculty. “Some of these colleges are functioning with only two or three teachers,” he said.

The young politician, who had a brief stint as a cricketer, also questioned the secular credentials of Nitish. “A person who admires a BJP leader like L.K. Advani cannot be secular. Nitish Kumar will have to explain to the secular forces in Bihar why he did not resign from the NDA government even after the horrible Godhra incident.”

On February 27, 2002, a Sabarmati Express was attacked by a mob at Godhra in Gujarat, which set it on fire. Fifty-eight Hindu pilgrims, who were travelling from Ayodhya in Uttar Pradesh, were killed in the attack. This, in turn, sparked retaliatory violence against the minority community all over Gujarat. More than 700 members of the minority community and 200 people from other communities were killed.

Nitish Kumar was the railway minister when the Godhra incident occurred.

Lalu had also recently questioned why he had not resigned or taken any steps when the communal violence — that some international observers have also called genocide — began.

At the beginning of the programme, Tejaswi was offered a skull cap and a towel, which he donned quite readily.

A member in the audience, who did not want to reveal his name, later told The Telegraph: “This was reminiscent of Narendra Modi refusing to wear a namaazi topi during his Sadbhavna Fast in 2012.”

The Gujarat chief minister had refused to wear a similar skull cap during his Sadbhavna fast last year.