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Saturday , April 20 , 2013
 
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Since 1st March, 1999
 
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CIMA Gallary

A historian’s historian

Unlike 1919 (the year of the Rowlatt satyagraha), 1920 (Congress-Khilafat alliance), 1921 (non-cooperation movement), or 1922 (the burning of the police station at Chauri Chaura), 1923 is considered a somewhat quiet year in Indian history. But it was a significant year for Indian historians. On May 23, 1923, Ranajit Guha, the founder of the subaltern studies school, was born. ...   | Read..
 
Letters to the Editor
Hidden warts
Sir — The Indian Premier League is back with a new sponsor. The opening ceremony brought together s ...  | Read.. 
 
Acid tongue
Sir — Indian politicians are yet to learn to mind their language. The deputy chief minister of Maha ...  | Read.. 
 
Ugly colours
Sir — Holi is increasingly turning into a dangerous occasion because of the barbaric celebrations ( ...  | Read.. 
 
EDITORIAL

RUNNING FOR COVER

In Pakistan, the long arm of the law stretched itself a little longer as it caught up with a high-profile fugitive. This was ...   | Read..
 
REVIEW ARTS
Under a spell cast by the Bard
For Anya Theatre, Abanti Chakraborty actually holds an advantage in this arena, since she served on Tim Supple’s team for British Council’s all-India Midsummer Night’s Drea...  | Read.. 
 
Warm and pleasing
Music, movement and motivation have made the hearts of these secluded people joyous. Acceptance, forgiveness and love, along with the magic of music, dance, art and craft have...  | Read.. 
 
Only a few surprises
A mixed bag of art can sometimes be exasperating. This is why one wishes that the organizers of the numerous group exhibitions across the city would realize that although suc...  | Read.. 
 
OPED
Courage in question
The highlight of an annual Republic Day parade is the opening, with the nation honouring yet more of its brave sons or daught...  | Read.. 
 
SCRIPSI
Everybody’s born with some different thing at the core of their existence. And that thing, whatever it is, becomes like a heat source that runs each person from the inside. I have one too, of course. Like everybody else. But sometimes it gets out of hand. It swells or shrinks inside me, and it shakes me up. What I’d really like to do is find a way to communicate that feeling to another person. But I can’t seem to do it. They just don’t get it. Of course, the problem could be that I’m not explaining it very well, but I think it’s because they’re not listening very well. They pretend to be listening, but they’re not, really. So I get worked up sometimes, and I do some crazy things.— HARUKI MURAKAMI