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Wednesday , June 27 , 2012
 
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Police still in dark over lawyer death

Police in the state capital want to keep all options open to crack the mystery surrounding lawyer Sangita Sinha’s death. “All facts have to be checked to find out if the 45-year-old woman was murdered or she committed suicide. She could have also died a natural death,”

Patna city superintendent of police Kim told The Telegraph on Tuesday, six days after the decomposed body of the lawyer was found in her flat. The officer’s comment was virtually a U-turn from what she had said when the lawyer was found dead on Wednesday last week inside her unlocked apartment in the Budh Marg area. Kim had then said: “Prima facie, it looks to be a case of murder. The post-mortem report will make things clearer.”

However, with the autopsy report failing to shed any light, the officer on Tuesday said the police would now depend on the victim’s viscera report. “We are awaiting the viscera report, which can determine the cause of her death. Until we get it,it cannot be said for sure that she was murdered. It is also possible that she died a natural death or might have committed suicide,” she added.

The only occupant of a third-floor flat (number 35) in Vaibhav Apartment was a relative of retired police officer Anil Kumar Singh, who was gunned down by robbers on a train six years ago. The police team that had gone to investigate Sangita’s murder had found her nude and decomposed body. There were several bloodstains on her body and on the floor. Viscera reports, furnished by the Forensic Science Laboratory, Patna, take at least six months or more to reach the police. “There are many viscera samples to be tested and it takes a lot of time. But then if the police want the report fast on a priority basis, it can be done within days,” a source in the police told The Telegraph.

The sources added that though they had collected statements from a lot of people, nothing concrete has so far emerged. “Several theories are doing the rounds and the police cannot confirm anything particular at this moment. With the autopsy report not citing any concrete reason leading to her death, the doubts about the cause of the fatality are obvious,” another officer said.

The woman is survived by two sons. One of them is an advocate at Patna High Court. The other works in a private firm in Mumbai. The police, in the meantime, have also failed to solve the murder of an elderly couple in the Sahpur area on July 23 night. Ashok Malviya (65) and wife Savitri Devi (56) were found in a pool of blood with their throats slit on Sunday morning on the second floor of their residence the following morning. “The police have already said someone close to the couple had murdered them and there were no signs of a forceful entry into their place.

We are also going through the call records of calls made to and from the mobile phones used by the couple,” Danapur deputy superintendent of police Sushant Kumar Saroj told The Telegraph. “The reason of the killings can be anything — personal enmity, land conflict, or someone trying to grab the couple’s home,” he added.