US varsities feel the sting

At Wright State University in Ohio, the French horn and tuba professors are out. So is the accomplished swimming team.

By Stephanie Saul
  • Published 4.01.18
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Kansas State University

New York: At Wright State University in Ohio, the French horn and tuba professors are out. So is the accomplished swimming team.

At Kansas state, Italian classes are going the way of the Roman Empire.

And at the University of Central Missouri, The Muleskinner, the bi-weekly campus newspaper, is publishing online-only this year, saving $35,000 in printing costs.

Just as many universities believed that the financial wreckage left by the 2008 recession was behind them, campuses across the country have been forced to make new rounds of cuts, this time brought on, in large part, by a loss of international students.

Schools in the Midwest have been particularly hard hit - many of them non-flagship public universities that had come to rely heavily on tuition from foreign students.

The downturn follows a decade of explosive growth in foreign student enrollment, which now tops 1 million at US colleges and educational training programmes, and supplies $39 billion in revenue.

International enrollment began to flatten in 2016, partly because of changing conditions abroad and the increasing lure of schools in Canada, Australia and other English-speaking countries.

And since President Trump was elected, college administrators say, his rhetoric and more restrictive views on immigration have made the US even less attractive to international students. The Trump administration is more closely scrutinising visa applications.

New York Times News Service