Twitter boss 'resets' with 10-day silence

The social network he runs is defined by its constant, frenzied babble, but Twitter's chief executive has embraced the total opposite, going on a 10-day silent retreat at the end of 2017.

By James Titcomb in London
  • Published 3.01.18
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Twitter chief executive Jack Dorsey

London: The social network he runs is defined by its constant, frenzied babble, but Twitter's chief executive has embraced the total opposite, going on a 10-day silent retreat at the end of 2017.

Jack Dorsey has revealed that he had carried out a Vipassana meditation - an ancient pre-Buddhist technique that involves 10 days of silence, almost every minute of it spent in quiet reflection, over Christmas and New Year's.

Supporters say it purifies the mind and calms the "endless chatter" of the world around us - chatter that many would argue has been amplified many times over by social media.

During Dorsey's silence - which came shortly after Twitter introduced a new policy that saw several high profile far-Right figures banned - he missed the company being threatened with sanctions by a top MP, an outcry over a troll alert tool being banned, and 63 tweets from Donald Trump,.

"Just finished a 10 day silent meditation. Wow, what a reset! Fortunate & grateful I was able to take the time. Happy New Year! #Vipassana," wrote Dorsey, who has two full-time jobs running both Twitter and his payments company, Square.

He is known for waking up at 5am and often working an 18-hour day, splitting his time between the two companies' offices. As well as not speaking, Dorsey - who typically posts several times a day - signed off from Twitter during the period, last posting a praying hands emoji on December 21.

Dorsey is a regular meditator, but he is unlikely to be the only one taking a break from social media. Despite their growth, some users turned off Facebook, Twitter and Instagram last year amid criticism over their role in society and effect on users' mental wellbeing.

Studies showed that spending too much time on social media can increase feelings of isolation and that those who spend time passively consuming social media feel worse than those who abstain. A number of former Facebook executives have come out to criticise its effect on society, while the company itself has admitted that social media can be bad for you.

The Daily Telegraph