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Chain migration helps Trump in-laws

Melania parents take advantage of immigration programme that President hates

First Lady Melania Trump’s parents Viktor and Amalija Knavs

New York: President Trump has repeatedly and vehemently denounced what he calls "chain migration", in which adult American citizens can obtain residency for their relatives.

On Thursday, his Slovenian in-laws, Viktor and Amalija Knavs, became US citizens in a private ceremony in Manhattan by taking advantage of that same family-based immigration programme.

Asked if the Knavses had obtained citizenship through "chain migration," their lawyer, Michael Wildes, said, "I suppose." He said chain migration is a "dirtier" way of characterising what he called "a bedrock of our immigration process when it comes to family reunification".

Melania Trump had sponsored her parents for their green cards, Wildes said in describing the process by which the Knavses had become US citizens. "Once they had the green card, they then applied for citizenship when they were eligible," he said.

Even as his in-laws were going through the process, Trump was denouncing it. In November, he tweeted, "CHAIN MIGRATION must end now! Some people come in, and they bring their whole family with them, who can be truly evil. NOT ACCEPTABLE!"

Stephanie Grisham, the First Lady's communications director, said that because the Knavses are not part of the administration, "I'm not commenting on them."

Grisham directed further questions concerning the President's views on immigration - and the immigration status of his in-laws - to the West Wing, which did not immediately respond to emails and phone calls requesting comment.

The Knavses have a relatively high profile for presidential in-laws. They frequently travel with the Trumps and split their time between New York, Palm Beach and Washington, where they stay in the White House.

Since initial reports emerged in February that the Knavses had obtained permanent residency in the US, there has been a lack of clarity about when or how the couple received green cards. And unless the couple themselves divulge the timeline of their citizenship process, the applications and petitions are protected by privacy law.

President Donald Trump

Under immigration statutes, the Knavses would have needed to have their green cards for at least five years in order to apply for citizenship, along with fulfilling character, residency and civic knowledge requirements. The time to process an application for naturalisation in New York City typically ranges from 11 to 21 months, according to the US Citizenship and Immigration Services.

Their lawyer said that the couple had met the five-year requirement, but added, "I can't give further comment."

News of the ceremony prompted an immediate response on Twitter.

Ana Navarro, a Republican strategist and political commentator, tweeted, "I guess when it's Melania's Family, it's 'family reunification' and should be applauded. Everybody else, it's 'chain migration' and must be stopped."

But Mark Krikorian, the executive director of the Center for Immigration Studies, a think tank that supports tighter controls on immigration, said in an interview that the Knavses were following the law.

The President often rails against family-based immigration at his rallies, and has called it a pathway for terrorists to enter the country. He frequently reminds his audiences of the October terror attack in New York, where Sayfullo Saipov, an immigrant from Uzbekistan, ploughed a pickup truck down a bike lane, killing eight persons near the World Trade Center.

While the President never names Saipov he has been known to detail the attack.

New York Times News Service

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