State to monitor tech seats quota

The allotment of management quota seats in BTech courses at private engineering colleges will be controlled by the state government to ensure that poor but meritorious students benefit.

By MITA MUKHERJEE in Calcutta
  • Published 11.06.18
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Calcutta: The allotment of management quota seats in BTech courses at private engineering colleges will be controlled by the state government to ensure that poor but meritorious students benefit.

The government has received complaints that several colleges do not extend the benefit of management quota seats to underprivileged students, education minister Partha Chatterjee said.

Most private engineering colleges allegedly use the management quota to admit students against hefty fees.

Government rules stipulate that 15 per cent of the management quota seats in every private engineering college must be allotted to poor but meritorious students. Ten per cent of these students will be eligible for a complete fee waiver and five per cent would be charged half the fee.

Students selected through government counselling are required to pay around Rs 4 lakh for a four-year BTech course. The fees for management quota seats, on the other hand, can be as high as Rs 8 to 10 lakh, depending on the demand for the subject.

"We have decided to allot seats under the management quota centrally from the department. Some students and guardians have been telling us over the past few years that meritorious students are unable to pursue BTech courses at private engineering colleges because some institutions are not offering them the benefit. We want the seats under the management quota to be allotted centrally so that we can find out if the allegations are true," Chatterjee said at an event organised by private engineering colleges at Netaji Indoor Stadium recently.

Several owners of private engineering colleges Metro spoke to said they were not aware of such complaints but wouldn't mind if the seats were allotted by the government because in the absence of industry in the state, there has been a decline in the demand for engineering courses.

Students seeking admission under the management quota will have to submit their applications directly to the higher education department, minister Chatterjee said. The department will screen the applications and allot seats to them based on merit.

"We have no objection if the management quota seats are allotted by the government. Our group runs seven colleges and we don't have enough takers for seats," said Taranjit Singh, the managing director of the JIS Group of colleges.

For admission to BTech courses in private engineering colleges, students who have cracked the joint entrance examinations are eligible for a seat through the centralised counselling conducted by the state joint entrance board. They can also take direct admission under the management quota.

Students with lower ranks the joint entrance examination often opt for management quota seats.