Rain comeback on radar

A dead cyclone and a baby cyclonic circulation drew a curtain of clouds over the Calcutta sky today and are likely to bring some rain to the city at the fag end of the monsoon.

By Rith Basu
  • Published 18.09.17
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An overcast sky over the Parama flyover on Sunday afternoon. Picture by Sanjoy Chattopadhyaya

Sept. 17: A dead cyclone and a baby cyclonic circulation drew a curtain of clouds over the Calcutta sky today and are likely to bring some rain to the city at the fag end of the monsoon.

The clouds brought down the day temperature by blocking the sun but pushed up the humidity, resulting in a sweaty and uncomfortable condition.

The weather office has predicted moderate rainfall in Calcutta tomorrow, which means anything between 20 and 59mm in 24 hours.

Typhoon Doksuri - a cyclonic storm that had originated over the Pacific Ocean and made landfall in north-east Vietnam on Thursday, killing four persons - weakened and dissipated by Saturday.

But some of the clouds formed under the influence of the storm floated to Calcutta this morning, weather scientists said.

The other system that contributed to the cloud formation was a cyclonic circulation that had formed over north Bay of Bengal two days ago.

A cyclonic circulation is a weaker system compared with a cyclonic storm, which is also called cyclone. If conditions are favourable, a cyclonic circulation intensifies into cyclonic storm after passing through intermediate stages such as depression and deep depression.

"The clouding over Calcutta is likely to last at least till Monday. The day temperature fell because... much of the sunlight was cut off," said G.K. Das, director, India Meteorological Department, Calcutta.

Moderate rainfall, he said, is likely in the city and the coastal areas of Bengal because of the clouding.

The city had last received rain a week ago - on Tuesday. The Alipore Met office had registered just 6.4mm of rain, which is considered light rain. Meteorologists said such rainless phases were usual in September, when the monsoon draws to a close.