JU probe into marks mismatch

Jadavpur University will start an inquiry to find out what caused "variation between the marks initially awarded to the admission test scripts in history and the marks awarded to the same scripts" after a re-evaluation.

By Subhankar Chowdhury in Jadavpur
  • Published 21.08.18
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Jadavpur: Jadavpur University will start an inquiry to find out what caused "variation between the marks initially awarded to the admission test scripts in history and the marks awarded to the same scripts" after a re-evaluation.

"The probe will start very soon. I want to make it clear that the probe will not in any way impact the ongoing admission to the BA (history) course," acting registrar Chiranjeeb Bhattacharya said on Monday.

The two-day admission started on Monday.

The decision to probe the mismatch in marks was taken at a meeting chaired by vice-chancellor Suranjan Das.

Fifteen new names are among the first 70 on the revised merit list for the undergraduate course in history that was published on Friday.

The university had announced that it would admit 70 students to the course.

The revised list was prepared following a review of the answer scripts of all 344 candidates by external examiners.

The university decided to review the scripts after complaints that as many as 55 students who had scored 90 per cent or more in the Plus II board exams were awarded 10 or less out of 100 in the admission test. The evaluation was done by teachers of the department.

The university issued a notice on Monday saying: "Adverse public response resulted following variation between the marks initially awarded.... The university now deems it eminently necessary to try to find out if any procedural or otherwise lapses due to which variation occurred so that its occurrence in the future can be pre-empted. For that the university proposes to initiate an enquiry into the matter which will be conducted by someone of eminence and high stature and not connected with the university."

Education minister Partha Chatterjee, who had last November suggested that the university admit students to all courses on the basis of their Plus-II scores, said after the publication of the revised list: "Some had got zero (in the earlier evaluation), now nobody has got zero.... An institution should not follow multiple methods of admission.... Let the JU authorities judge whether this has enhanced or lowered their prestige. Let them introspect."

Bhattacharya was asked if the university would take action if the inquiry identified any teacher as having erred in assessment. He said: "Let the committee submit the report. The university will take a call."