JU degree with pick of diverse subjects

The choice-based credit system (CBCS) is coming to Jadavpur University, bringing with it flexibility for students and challenges for the authorities in offering a pick of subjects across disciplines.

By Mita Mukherjee in Jadavpur
  • Published 28.10.17
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Jadavpur: The choice-based credit system (CBCS) is coming to Jadavpur University, bringing with it flexibility for students and challenges for the authorities in offering a pick of subjects across disciplines.

Once the system is fully implemented, a mechanical engineering student would be able to choose English as a compulsory subject and a mathematics student can maybe pick geography on the side.

"Jadavpur University will soon introduce choice based credit system so that students enjoy the liberty to pick subjects from across the three faculties: arts, science and engineering," JU vice-chancellor Suranjan Das told Metro.

The university plans to implement the system across all three streams next year, Das said.

The decision is in line with the University Grants Commission (UGC)'s recommendation to all state-aided universities to switch to CBCS along with semesters at the undergraduate and postgraduate levels by 2018.

"Jadavpur University has had the semester system for a long time," vice-chancellor Das said.

Postgraduate departments at Jadavpur University also have a CBCS-like format where students can choose a small course that is a departure from their main field of study. The options are limited, though. "At the postgraduate level, we have a cluster of subjects and students have to choose within that basket. There is no scope to pick a subject which is not in the basket. In the realm of CBCS, students can study any subject across disciplines," said an official.

Calcutta University introduced semesters and CBCS in commerce at the undergraduate level this year. Arts and science at the undergraduate level are next, possibly in 2018.

Chiranjib Bhattacharjee, dean of engineering and technology at Jadavpur University, said the syllabi of 17 subjects were being revised in preparation for the switch. But the university has yet to finalise when the rollout would happen in engineering.