Front mirrors for buses: traffic boss

All buses will have to install a mirror in the front that projects outwards, like the ones in some AC buses, to enable drivers to see if there is a pedestrian immediately ahead - an area often not visible to bus drivers.

By A STAFF REPORTER
  • Published 10.08.18
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EM Bypass: All buses will have to install a mirror in the front that projects outwards, like the ones in some AC buses, to enable drivers to see if there is a pedestrian immediately ahead - an area often not visible to bus drivers.

Many pedestrians get run over because the elevated height of buses often prevents drivers from seeing the stretch right in front of the vehicle.

"There are some blind spots that are not visible on side and rear-view mirrors. One of them is the position immediately in front of the bus. Mirrors that are projected outwards in front of the driver will help reduce the blind spot zone," said Bhargab Maitra, a professor of civil engineering at IIT Kharagpur.

Buses usually have only side mirrors and a rear-view mirror.

"All buses in the city and across the state will have to install front mirrors. We will begin with state buses and then enforce the rule on private buses as well," said Sumit Kumar, deputy commissioner of police, traffic.

Kumar, who was speaking at a symposium on road safety organised by the Confederation of Indian Industry (CII), said buses comprised one per cent of the traffic on the city's roads but were responsible for 27 per cent of accidents.

Only a handful of AC buses running in Calcutta have the mirrors Kumar was talking about.

The front mirrors must be of superior quality and designed in a way to minimise the blind spots. "They cannot be negated completely but they can be reduced," Maitra said.

DC Kumar also said the police had filed 46 FIRs against repeat offenders of speed violation in the past month. They were caught on speed trackers.

"One of the drivers, who was found to overspeed 20 times was arrested," Kumar said.