Doc with city roots a star author in Britain

Who is Rangan Chaterjee and why has he suddenly become just about the most famous doctor in Britain - a bit of a heart throb, actually?

By Amit Roy in London
  • Published 3.01.18
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London: Who is Rangan Chaterjee and why has he suddenly become just about the most famous doctor in Britain - a bit of a heart throb, actually?

For starters, Chatterjee, son of a doctor, Tarun Chatterjee, who came to England from Calcutta in the 1960s, has written a book, The 4 Pillar Plan: How to Relax, Eat, Move and Sleep Your Way to a Longer, Healthier Life, which is now No. 1 on Amazon UK.

"I am a Bengali boy and this book will have special appeal for Bengalis who tend to eat late at night," Chatterjee told The Telegraph, as he remembered frequent Calcutta holidays at his father's home in Shyambazar and his mother Bandana's in Chetla.

Chatterjee, who has been interviewed by BBC News, The Daily Telegraph, the Daily Mail, the Daily Express and elsewhere, appears to have struck a chord by focusing "on finding the root cause of diseases and helping my patients make their illnesses disappear".

"The handsome 40-year-old father-of-two, star of BBC One's Doctor in the House, is at the forefront of a new generation of social-media-savvy medics," wrote one interviewer about the 6ft 6in tall doctor who lives in Wilmslow, Cheshire, with his Gujarati wife, Vidhaata, a criminal barrister, and their children, aged seven and five.

Based on his "experiences serving as a doctor for nearly 20 years", Chatterjee, MBChB, BSc (Hons), MRCP, MRCGP, says that his "book goes beyond the sort of health advice we've all been reading about for so long - beyond the fad diets and the quick fix exercise programmes".

His plan has been endorsed by, among others. Celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, who believes "Rangan's easy, common-sense plan can help everyone live a happier, healthier life".

Two events have shaped Chatterjee's life - one was caring for his father who died five years ago. He was a consultant at Manchester Royal Infirmary, "a first-generation immigrant, who worked and worked and worked".

Even more traumatic was the near death of his infant son who was diagnosed with "an easily rectified calcium deficiency".

With a sensible diet, exercise and meditation, Chatterjee says: "I have routinely helped my patients reverse type 2 diabetes; eliminate irritable bowel syndrome; lower blood pressure without drugs; reduce menopausal symptoms naturally; sleep better and regain their energy; regain control of their autoimmune conditions; restore harmony to their circadian rhythms; add life to their years, as well as years to their life."