CU fixes cut-off mismatch

Students who want to study BTech in jute and fibre technology in Calcutta University will need a total of 60 per cent in physics, chemistry and math at Plus II from next year.

By Subhankar Chowdhury in Calcutta
  • Published 31.10.17
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Calcutta: Students who want to study BTech in jute and fibre technology in Calcutta University will need a total of 60 per cent in physics, chemistry and math at Plus II from next year.

For reserved category students, the cut-off will be 55 per cent in the three subjects, Amlan Chakraborty, university dean of technology, said. The move will make the eligibility criteria for BTech courses uniform at the university.

The university, which started the jute and fibre technology BTech course in 1999, had 45 per cent as the cut-off for general category students and 40 per cent for reserved category till now. Cracking JEE is a must, though.

The BTech courses in computer science & engineering, information technology, radio physics & electronics, chemical engineering, chemical technology, polymer science & technology, applied physics, and applied optics & photonics have 60 per cent as the cut-off for general category and 55 for reserved category.

Apart from Jadavpur and Calcutta universities and Neotia University, which started offering BTech courses last year, government and private engineering colleges follow the basic eligibility criteria set by the JEE board.

The board has 45 per cent at Plus II mandatory for general category and 40 per cent for reserved category students.

So far, Calcutta University followed the rule only for jute and fibre technology.

"This mismatch led to other BTech students asking why the cut-off was lower for jute and fibre technology," a professor and member of the engineering admission committee said.

Those with low Plus II marks find it difficult to cope with the four-year course, a professor of jute and fibre technology said. "Last year, 13 of 55 students failed in the first year. We can solve this problem if the cut-off is raised." That way students with good command over science subjects will get admitted, he said.

Jute and fibre technology has 66, the highest, among the 165 BTech seats the university offers.