Monday, 30th October 2017

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City lags in quality index

Calcutta has ranked sixth among seven Indian cities in a Quality of Living report prepared by Mercer, a global consulting firm that has been doing the survey for two decades.

By Subhajoy Roy in Calcutta
  • Published 22.03.18
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Calcutta: Calcutta has ranked sixth among seven Indian cities in a Quality of Living report prepared by Mercer, a global consulting firm that has been doing the survey for two decades.

The last on the list is Delhi.

The survey covered 450 cities across the world. Apart from Calcutta and Delhi, the Indian cities in the fray were Pune, Hyderabad, Mumbai, Bengaluru and Chennai.

While Vienna has ranked first among all the cities surveyed, Hyderabad and Pune have jointly topped the list of the Indian competitors (see chart).

On the global list, Hyderabad and Pune have ranked 142. Calcutta's rank is 160.

Mercer says on its website that the categories taken into consideration to prepare the list are consumer goods, economic environment, housing, natural environment, schools and education, medical and health considerations, public services and transport, political and social environment, socio-cultural environment and recreation.

An official associated with the survey said the Indian cities were yet to make any significant progress from last year in regard to quality of living. The official, however, also pointed out that a key driver in the Indian cities had been investment in physical infrastructure, including airports and public transport.

The report shows that New Delhi and Mumbai have made significant progress since 1998. Delhi has made 13.8 per cent progress and Mumbai 7.3 per cent.

Eastern European cities have made the maximum progress over the past 20 years, according to the report.

This year Mercer has also prepared a sanitation ranking. Here, too, Calcutta has ranked sixth among the Indian cities.

Some of the parameters for the sanitation ranking were waste removal, sewage infrastructure and air pollution. More than 700 people were down with diarrhoea in Baghajatin, Patuli and Jadavpur in February.

The survey is conducted annually to enable multinational companies and organisations to compensate employees while sending them on international assignments.

Asked about the survey, writer Amit Chaudhuri said: "Such rankings are arbritrary.... It is a wake-up call for CMC. Calcutta is becoming more and more frayed at the edges, and also at the centre. This is a sharp nudge to CMC."