Cattle risk in speed corridor

Speed and recklessness aren't the only accident hazards to be wary of while driving down the 10.5km corridor between Technopolis in Sector V and Chinar Park on the edge of New Town. Beware of cattle straying onto the six-lane Major Arterial Road, where three lives were lost on Thursday afternoon.

By Snehal Sengupta
  • Published 27.10.17
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New Town: Speed and recklessness aren't the only accident hazards to be wary of while driving down the 10.5km corridor between Technopolis in Sector V and Chinar Park on the edge of New Town. Beware of cattle straying onto the six-lane Major Arterial Road, where three lives were lost on Thursday afternoon.

Six-year-old Deepshika Chakraborty, her father Pravat and his colleague Goutam were killed when a motorbike skidded off the road when the rider tried to avoid six cows that had strayed onto the carriageway near the Akankha crossing, a five-minute drive from City Centre New Town.

The danger of cattle coming in the way of traffic is something motorists are used to, especially after dusk when several stretches of the New Town expressway plunge into darkness because of shadows cast by the overhead Airport-New Garia Metro corridor and faulty street lamps in some places.

Rajdeep Ray, whose home is in Action Area I of New Town, should know. He has had several near-misses with cattle since moving into the township. "I have to suddenly brake almost every other day to let cattle pass. If they are not crossing the road, they are on it," he said.

Subho Biswas, who lives near Rabindra Tirtha, said the threat from cattleto cars had increased with New Town becoming busier. "There are patches of shrub and fields along the main road. The authorities should fence them so that cattle cannot cross over and hit the thoroughfare."

Cows and goats grazing in the fields separating clusters of highrises is a common sight in New Town.

The police estimate that more than 100 cows and goats get injured or are run over every year by vehicles passing through New Town. "We can do little about it. Unlike cars, violating rules, cows cannot be fined, after all. And where do we find the owners? A possible solution is to fence both sides of the road to prevent cattle incursions," said an officer in the Bidhannagar police commissionerate.