Minister push for 'Sampurna' scheme

Health minister Pratap Jena on Friday wrote to all the ward members of the state and president of the gaon kalyan samitis urging them to implement the Sampurna (Sishu Abong Matru Mrityuhara Purna Nirakaran Abhijan) scheme to reduce maternal and child mortality rate in the state.

By Our Correspondent in Bhubaneshwar
  • Published 18.11.17
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Bhubaneswar: Health minister Pratap Jena on Friday wrote to all the ward members of the state and president of the gaon kalyan samitis urging them to implement the Sampurna (Sishu Abong Matru Mrityuhara Purna Nirakaran Abhijan) scheme to reduce maternal and child mortality rate in the state.

The scheme provides financial assistance to pregnant women of the state living in inaccessible areas.

Under the scheme, transportation cost of Rs 1,000 is provided to beneficiaries living in inaccessible areas, where the ambulances of government hospitals (102/108) and other four vehicle hospitals cannot reach, to come to the hospital at time of delivery.

The money is directly transferred to the beneficiary's account.

The scheme is expected to provide benefit around 60,000 pregnant women every year.

In his letter, Jena said that under the scheme, 7,853 villages have been covered.

In his letter, he urged the ward members to take an oath that not a single woman of their village would die due to lack of medical facilities. He also asked them to take benefit of the Sampurna scheme.

Vaccination

The state government has asked the collectors of 13 districts - Balasore, Cuttack, Dhenkanal, Ganjam, Kalahandi, Kendrapara, Khurda, Koraput, Nabarangpur, Puri, Rayagada, Sonepur and Sundargarh to launch the Japanese Encephalitis vaccination campaign.

A person of any age can be vaccinated against the disease.

However, children up to 15 years are especially vulnerable to Japanese Encephalitis.

According to National Health Profile, between January and December in 2014, Odisha had registered 990 cases and 116 deaths due to the diesase. In 2015, Odisha recorded the highest cases of Japanese Encephalitis at 1,451 and 118 deaths.

Pigs and wild birds are hosts of the virus.

The Japanese Encephalitis virus is spread by infected mosquitoes.

It infects humans when an infected mosquito bites a human.

Symptoms include rapid onset of high fever, headache, neck stiffness, disorientation, coma, seizures, spastic paralysis and ultimately death.