Monday, 30th October 2017

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Diet & yoga tips to keep stress at bay

With less than a month to go for the board exams, experts say it is necessary to keep both the body and the mind calm to remain stress-free.

By ANWESHA AMBALY in Bhubaneshwar
  • Published 30.01.18
  •  
EAT WELL, SLEEP WELL, DO WELL IN EXAMS

Bhubaneswar: With less than a month to go for the board exams, experts say it is necessary to keep both the body and the mind calm to remain stress-free.

During the exam season, doctors stress on maintaining a fixed food pattern. "Erratic eating habits will show symptoms such as indigestion, dehydration, nausea and vomiting ahead of the examinations. A proper diet chart is necessary to keep fit," said physician Ankita Musadi.

"Our muscles become tense due to stress, and being in that state for a long time causes musculoskeletal pain. It shows up in the shoulders and jaw, and then spreads to other parts of the body," she said. Dietitian Deepshikha Halder was for a strict no to late night studies, which reduces oxygen flow to brain. She advised for early morning studies.

She stressed on eating fruits such as banana, orange and guava. "Lunch should include high protein foods such as dal, fish, green vegetables and salads. The evening snacks should include a cup of energy drink with simple homemade snacks. Dinner must be very light and parents must ensure that their wards go to be bed by 10pm," she said.

She further said one should keep eating in short intervals, as it would ensure that they get enough nutrition for the entire day.

Doctors also advised that the students should keep themselves hydrated during these stressful times.

"Make sure your diet is full of food that is high on water content, because fluids aid mental alertness. It will enhance concentration and prevent headaches. Coconut water, lassi, buttermilk, chaas, juices and soups are the fluids that could be opted for," said physician S.N. Mohanty.

He also suggested intake of memory-enhancer foods such as lish, a good source of Omega 3 fatty acids, sesame and flax seeds and stress-buster foods such as eggs and nuts.

"The brain is going to reach a saturation point in about two to three hours of constant study. To ensure the brain is able to absorb and process new information, one needs to take short breaks regularly," said student counsellor Lipsa Priyadarshini.

Experts felt that the students could also engage themselves in mind-calming activities such as meditation, and yoga to control stress.

"It will help combat the pre-exam jitters, which often undo all the hard work and preparation. If done daily, one would also witness a considerable raise in your memory retention," said yoga instructor Christine Stein.