Deal inked to use local language in govt work

The Institute of Odia Studies and Research (IOSR) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the general administration department to help conduct all official communications of the department, computer assignments and training in Odia.

By Bibhuti Barik in Bhubaneshwar
  • Published 1.04.15
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The state secretariat. Telegraph picture

Bhubaneswar, March 31: The Institute of Odia Studies and Research (IOSR) has signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the general administration department to help conduct all official communications of the department, computer assignments and training in Odia.

The institute, which had played an important role in documenting the classical nature of Odia language along with the culture department, hopes to rope in other departments in the future.

The institute will not charge any money for the venture. The MoU will be executed through an agency called Centre for Modernisning Government Initiatives on behalf of the state government.

IOSR secretary Subrat Prusty said: "There was a perception among the babus that there weren't enough people to help any government department to have an efficient communication network in Odia. But we have assured them that we can do this."

IOSR became known in the research and administrative circle last year when Odia language was accorded the classical status by the Centre. The document submitted to the Centre on Odia's literary tradition was drafted by IOSR researchers.

"In future, we hope that we may go for more research-based work in Odia if we get offers from the culture university and the proposed Central Institute of Classical Odia or the language museum in particular," said Prusty.

The city-based institute is a co-organiser of the second national language conference being held at Institute of Physics, Bhubaneswar.

School and mass education minister Debiprasad Mishra said: "The state government is eager to implement the use of Odia in all official communication and to implement it effectively, the post of director of the Odia Bhasa Pratisthan has been upgraded."

Earlier, a reader-ranked official from the education department was heading the Odia Bhasa Pratisthan.

"We hope that the new head of the Pratisthan will work effectively," Mishra said.

Odisha was the first state in the country to be declared as a separate state on a linguistic basis. On October 14, 1954, Orissa Official Language Act was passed declaring it the official language of the state. On June 6, 1972, the state gazette notified that all government work and the lower courts should use Odia as the language of communication except Ganjam and Koraput districts, where it allowed use of Telugu in some pockets.

The general administration department, on December 1, 2012, asked all the secretaries of the state government to conduct recruitment in Odia and English.