Reel tribute to Ram Dayal

The life and work of late Ram Dayal Munda, the iconic tribal scholar and musician, will be brought alive on screen in a documentary made by national award-winning filmmaker duo Biju Toppo and Meghnath Bhattacharya.

By ARTI S. SAHULIYAR
  • Published 5.01.17
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The life and work of late Ram Dayal Munda, the iconic tribal scholar and musician, will be brought alive on screen in a documentary made by national award-winning filmmaker duo Biju Toppo and Meghnath Bhattacharya.

Titled Nachi Se Banchi (Dance to Survive), the 70-minute documentary, having a total budget of Rs 11 lakh, has been extensively shot in Munda's home town Khunti and other parts of Ranchi. The film, which took almost a year to complete, has been named after Munda's slogan nachi se banchi as he believed that tribals would survive only if their culture continued to flourish.

"His (Munda) first love was tribal music and restoration of tribal culture. We are planning to screen the documentary at multiplexes in Ranchi so that it reaches more people," said Toppo.

The documentary-maker added that the film was not only a tribute to the Padma Shri recipient, but was also meant to convey his message about preserving tribal culture.

The documentary was sent to Film Division of India (FDI) for approval last month. FDI is a film production house belonging to the Union ministry of information and broadcasting. Nachi Se Banchi has been produced by FDI in collaboration with Akhra, a group working in the field of culture and communication in Jharkhand and has been making films on indigenous people's issues since 1995. The group has produced many award-winning films that took up burning issues related to the indigenous people's survival. Both Toppo and Bhattacharya are associated with Akhra.We have designed the poster using water colours. The documentary vividly depicts Munda saab's works and how he fought for the rights of the tribal people of Jharkhand. The film also sheds light on the fact that apart from his passion for dance and music, Munda saab was a great flautist," said Karmakar, who has watched the documentary.