Bonsai love in steel city

Did you know that the culture of growing miniature trees in tubs, called bonsais, was developed in China but it was the Japanese who sprinkled the dash of art to this hobby which has gained much popularity in India as well?

By Our Correspondent in Jamshedpur
  • Published 16.10.17
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Jamshedpur: Did you know that the culture of growing miniature trees in tubs, called bonsais, was developed in China but it was the Japanese who sprinkled the dash of art to this hobby which has gained much popularity in India as well?

Bonsai enthusiasts got to exchange such trivia and techniques relating to their passion on Sunday at the fourth Bonsai Fiesta organised by the Horticultural Society of Jamshedpur at Tube Markers' Club in Nildih on Sunday.

"Growing bonsai is like nurturing your child. You can grow a miniature forest in your house. When you develop a bonsai, you do not want to destroy trees," said Dinkar Anand, the organising president of the fourth Bonsai Fiesta.

The first half of the event was a general awareness session for amateurs, the second half was a technical session meant for professional gardeners.

Chief guest and forests chief conservator S.K. Gupta invited Jamshedpur Horticultural Society, to organise similar events at the Dalma Wildlife Sanctuary and said it will attract more visitors to the sanctuary.

He added that the activity can also spread awareness on flora and fauna.

The Bonsai Fiesta showcased the work of around 100 presenters who displayed miniature forms of mango, banyan, peepal and other large species of trees.

Calcutta-based bonsai specialist Pranab Mallick was the key resource person at the sessions. He demonstrated how he groomed his bonsai over a six-month period.

"The cutting and pruning of bonsais should take place every 15 days. Though it looks beautiful there are a lot of challenges that gardeners face. Sometimes trees are too underdeveloped or they grow too fast which has to be controlled. There are steps that have to be followed," said Mallick who started experimenting with bonsai in the 1970s.

Terracotta sculptures and iron scrap which enhance garden looks were also on display.