Beware of sand trap on flyover

Sand gathered along guard walls of a key flyover in the capital is proving to be dangerous for vehicles, particularly two-wheelers, that are skidding even at moderate speeds, and leading to a number of accidents.

By OUR SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT in Ranchi
  • Published 14.06.18
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DEADLY STRETCH: Sand flanks the Namkum flyover in Ranchi on Wednesday. The spillover effect of trucks carrying sand from the Subernarekha riverbed, this is a regular phenomenon that often causes two-wheelers to skid. Picture by Manob Chowdhary

Ranchi: Sand gathered along guard walls of a key flyover in the capital is proving to be dangerous for vehicles, particularly two-wheelers, that are skidding even at moderate speeds, and leading to a number of accidents.

On Tuesday, two persons on a bike coming towards Kantatoli on the Namkum flyover that links the city with NH-33 leading to Jamshedpur had a close shave.

"A truck was coming behind us at great speed and honking. So, I moved to the left to allow it to pass. But the front wheel of our bike skidded on sand that was lying there. Somehow, I managed to maintain balance and was able to apply the brakes," Samir Singh told this reporter, who happened to be there at the time.

According to Rakesh Singh, a casual worker in the health department office nearby, accidents were a frequent occurrence on the flyover or its approach roads, both of which are littered with sand from trucks that, he believed, were picking up sand form the Subernarekha riverbed.

"The sand on the flyover is because of sand lifting from the Subernarekha river. Sand is usually carried by trucks and tractors in the wee hours or during night. Also, Ranchi Municipal Corporation (RMC) is not cleaning the flyover or its approach roads regularly," Singh said, adding that skidding of vehicles was almost a daily affair.

Officer in-charge of Namkum police station Rai Soumitra Bhushan Pankaj admitted there was a safety issue on the flyover. "For the last few days, I have been seeing sand all across the flyover and, to some extent, beyond it as well near Durga Soren Chowk. Often, accidents do occur as a result," he said.

Pankaj, however, could not provide details of the number of accidents that occurred on the flyover. But he added that the area under his jurisdiction, which was from the flyover till Namkum block, seven FIRs were registered on an average every month.

"I am only talking about accidents with casualties. The numbers could be much more, but in several cases those involved in accidents often prefer to opt to settle the issue without lodging a formal police complaint," he said.

RMC public relations officer Naresh Kumar Sinha promised to have the flyover cleaned. "I will immediately direct the RMC's health wing that manages the daily roster of cleaning staff to ensure the road is cleaned regularly," he said.