A view of Japan at night from the International Space Station (ISS)

The infinite wonders of Earth, seen from space

Scintillating images from afar of the planet we call home

By New York Times News Service
  • Published 19.05.19, 1:07 PM
  • Updated 19.05.19, 1:07 PM
  • a min read
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Courtesy: NYTNS
Photo Credit: Courtesy: NYTNS
Scott Kelly with fresh produce aboard the ISS

It was not supposed to be a photo safari. Nasa lofted astronaut Scott Kelly into orbit aboard the International Space Station in March 2015 for a year so that scientists could learn what happens to the human body during long missions in space.

But between blood draws and equipment repairs, Kelly aimed a Nikon D4 toward the windows of the space station’s cupola or a porthole in the floor of a laboratory module.

A snowstorm over the East Coast of the US, the ethereal aurora, the Pantone deserts of North Africa, the vast swirl of the Caribbean — Kelly captured it all and then shared it, turning Twitter into an eye on Earth. Many of the images are collected in a book, Infinite Wonder.

One day the data gleaned from Kelly’s medical experiments may open the door to new worlds. His photos give us an unrivaled glimpse at the one we’ve already got.

Courtesy: NYTNS
Photo Credit: Courtesy: NYTNS
The Mediterranean coast of France
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Photo Credit: Courtesy: NYTNS
The moon, Venus and Jupiter seen from the space station
Courtesy: NYTNS
Photo Credit: Courtesy: NYTNS
A frozen lake in the Himalayas
Courtesy: NYTNS
Photo Credit: Courtesy: NYTNS
A look at Egypt from space