Microscope

A Kiwi father-son duo has captured 3D colour X-rays of the human body based on a technology developed at CERN. The new scanner developed by the radio-logist son, Anthony Butler, and his physicist father, Phil, may eventually help diagnose cancers and blood diseases more accurately and without invasive surgery. The device was adapted from a pixel-detecting tool that physicists use for particle tracking at the Large Had-ron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

  • Published 23.07.18
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LHC spins off a 3D scanner

• A Kiwi father-son duo has captured 3D colour X-rays of the human body (wrist in pic above) based on a technology developed at CERN. The new scanner developed by the radio-logist son, Anthony Butler, and his physicist father, Phil, may eventually help diagnose cancers and blood diseases more accurately and without invasive surgery. The device was adapted from a pixel-detecting tool that physicists use for particle tracking at the Large Had-ron Collider (LHC) at CERN.

Roman whales

• Ancient bones from whales found around the Strait of Gibraltar suggest a forgotten Roman whaling industry may have driven these animals to extinction. The bones, dating to the first few centuries AD or earlier, belong to North Atlantic right whales - a coastal migratory species that is no longer found in European waters - says a study by Ana Rodrigues, an ecologist from the Centre for Functional and Evolutionary Ecology in France.

Eye of an owl

• Barn owls have simpler brains than primates, but they process visual information in much the same way as humans. Their eyes are round, not spherical, and this helps the bird focus on prey amid shifting environment and even in the pitch dark. Scientists at the Technion Israel Institute of Technology found this.

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