Microscope

A blackhole in a nearby galaxy ripped up a star that came too close to it, astronomers recently reported in the journal, Science.

  • Published 25.06.18
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Dusty death of a star 

A blackhole in a nearby galaxy ripped up a star that came too close to it, astronomers recently reported in the journal, Science. The astronomers had initially thought they were seeing a supernova but later realised that it was a blackhole gobbling up half a star. The other half was spit out in a fiery, long jet of radio energy. Such destruction of a star has rarely been recorded.

Aztec gems 

 Recent geochemical analysis of turquoise artefacts - highly prized in the Aztec civilisation - has found that the blue-green stones were mined in the area between central Mexico and Central America, though no mines of these gemstones have ever been found in this region. Turquoise forms near the surface as a product of copper weathering and there were plenty of copper mines in the region, which suggests turquoise deposits may once have been present there, too.

Bye, baobab 

 Across Africa, the oldest and largest baobabs have begun to fall and die, according to new research in the journal Nature Plants. Scientists believe that prolonged droughts and increasing temperatures may have parched the trees, leaving them unable to support the weight of their massive trunks.

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