Microscope

Recently, tiny diamonds were discovered in pieces of a meteorite that crashed in the Sudan desert a decade ago. These stones may have come from a destroyed planet that orbited our sun billions of years ago, scientists now believe. 

  • Published 7.05.18
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Diamonds in the dust

• Recently, tiny diamonds were discovered in pieces of a meteorite that crashed in the Sudan desert a decade ago. These stones may have come from a destroyed planet that orbited our sun billions of years ago, scientists now believe. "We have in our hands a piece of a former planet that was spinning around the sun before the end of the formation of today's solar system," said Philippe Gillet, a planetary scientist at the Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne, Switzerland. He is also co-author of the paper that was published in Nature Communications.

Eyebrow story

• Recent findings in Nature Ecology & Evolution suggest that the human brow has always been a social tool, and that the smoother foreheads and expressive brows of modern humans may have evolved to accommodate our increasingly complex relationships. Scientists have long thought that the thick bony brow ridges of early humans served some structural purpose but the recent study found no evidence of it.

Fishy struggles

• If you've watched Finding Nemo, you're familiar with the special relationship between clown fish and the anemones they call home. When warmer oceans bleach anemones, the clown fish that live in them become very stressed and don't reproduce like they used to. The work, published recently in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, suggests the higher cost of living in a stressful environment may partly explain these struggles.

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