In Focus

The mention of the film, Gone with the Wind - one of the most successful cinematic projects in Hollywood - usually brings to mind the performances of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh but not of Hattie McDaniel, even though Hattie, who was born in June, 1895, received the Best Supporting Actress Award for essaying the role of Mammy in the same film. She was the first African-American woman to have received the honour.

  • Published 2.06.18
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• The mention of the film, Gone with the Wind - one of the most successful cinematic projects in Hollywood - usually brings to mind the performances of Clark Gable and Vivien Leigh but not of Hattie McDaniel, even though Hattie, who was born in June, 1895, received the Best Supporting Actress Award for essaying the role of Mammy in the same film. She was the first African-American woman to have received the honour. Multi-tasking was, evidently, Hattie's forte. Apart from acting in over 300 films - she only received credits for 80 of these productions - she also worked on radio and television: she happened to be the first Black woman to have performed as a singer on radio in the United States of America. A postage stamp was issued to honour Hattie's contribution to popular art.

• Experimenter Gallery (Ballygunge Place) is hosting Ruminations of Labour, in which the participating artists explore, among other things, the ideas and politics associated with the concept of labour in a capitalist society, leading to the [re]imagination of labour as an aesthetic and as resistance. The show will end on July 31.

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