Fitchits

Researchers interviewed 501 couples who were trying to get pregnant without medical assistance. The participants kept diaries on their diet and other health and behavioural habits, including fish consumption. The researchers followed the pairs for a year or until pregnancy. They found that men who had two or more 4-ounce servings of fish a week had a 47 per cent shorter time to pregnancy, and women a 60 per cent shorter time, than those who ate fewer servings a week. By 12 months, 92 per cent of the couples who ate fish twice a week or more were pregnant, compared with 79 per cent among those who ate less. The study, in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, controlled for age, education level, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity and other factors.

By Nytns
  • Published 20.06.18
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Trying for a baby?

Researchers interviewed 501 couples who were trying to get pregnant without medical assistance. The participants kept diaries on their diet and other health and behavioural habits, including fish consumption. The researchers followed the pairs for a year or until pregnancy. They found that men who had two or more 4-ounce servings of fish a week had a 47 per cent shorter time to pregnancy, and women a 60 per cent shorter time, than those who ate fewer servings a week. By 12 months, 92 per cent of the couples who ate fish twice a week or more were pregnant, compared with 79 per cent among those who ate less. The study, in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, controlled for age, education level, smoking, alcohol intake, physical activity and other factors.

Antibiotics & kidney stones

Cases of kidney stones are increasing all over the world and new research suggests that oral antibiotics might be a trigger. The study, published in The Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, found that exposure to five classes of antibiotics significantly increased the risk for kidney stones. The drugs ranged from penicillin - which increased the risk by 27 per cent - to sulfa drugs, which increased it by more than 200 per cent. Children younger than 18 were at higher risk than adults. Dr Gregory Tasian, a urologist at Children's Hospital in Philadelphia, the US, suggests the explanation is a complex interaction of the drugs with gut microbiome.

Good posture, better mood

Your posture is more important than you know. Take slouching - it promotes low mood and decreased energy levels, says Erik Peper, a professor in the department of health education at San Francisco State University, the US. People prone to depression or low energy may be exacerbating those states with poor posture. Last year, a study from New Zealand linked upright posture with improved mood and energy among people with symptoms of depression. Another study found that the bent-over posture associated with smartphone use could impair respiratory function.

Air pollution and hypertension

Exposure to air pollution in the womb is associated with an increased risk for high blood pressure in childhood, researchers say. The study, published in Hypertension, measured air pollution exposure in 1,293 pregnant women by matching each one's address with readings from the nearest air quality monitor. The study controlled for the mothers' age and smoking. "High blood pressure in children portends high blood pressure in adults, which leads to higher cardiovascular disease risk," Noel T. Mueller, an assistant professor of epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.