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Drinking coffee has been associated with lower mortality rates for a while but a new study suggests that caffeine is not responsible for this effect. Researchers found that the risk of death from any cause - particularly from cancer and cardiovascular disease - declined steadily as coffee consumption increased. Those who drank a cup a day have 6 per cent lower risk than those who drank less than that, and people who drank eight or more cups a day have 14 per cent lower risk. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, adjusted for age, race, smoking, sex, body mass index and alcohol consumption. Interestingly, the associations were similar for not only ground and instant coffee but also for caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, making it likely that caffeine had no role to play in prolonging life.

By NYTNS
  • Published 25.07.18
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Long live coffee

Drinking coffee has been associated with lower mortality rates for a while but a new study suggests that caffeine is not responsible for this effect. Researchers found that the risk of death from any cause - particularly from cancer and cardiovascular disease - declined steadily as coffee consumption increased. Those who drank a cup a day have 6 per cent lower risk than those who drank less than that, and people who drank eight or more cups a day have 14 per cent lower risk. The study, published in JAMA Internal Medicine, adjusted for age, race, smoking, sex, body mass index and alcohol consumption. Interestingly, the associations were similar for not only ground and instant coffee but also for caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, making it likely that caffeine had no role to play in prolonging life.

Probiotics good for your bones

A probiotic supplement could be good for your bones, a new study suggests. Researchers studied 90 healthy women, 75 to 80 years old, with low bone mineral density. They measured bone density at the start of the study, and then randomly assigned them a placebo or two daily doses of freeze-dried Lactobacillus reuteri, an intestinal tract microbe that occurs naturally in many. After a year, they measured the women's bones again. The reduction in density in the shin bone was nearly half as large in women taking L. reuteri supplements as in those taking the placebo. The study was published in the Journal of Internal Medicine.